Effect of Morphine on Breathing Pattern: A Possible Factor in Atelectasis

L. D. Egbert, H. H. Bendixen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Atelectasis can be prevented by intermittent deep breathing. Patients with severe abdominal pain take occasional deep breaths, but these differ from those of normal volunteers. When morphine is given, deep breathing ceases. It appears that morphine, in doses which do not grossly depress ventilation and exchange of gases, may depress the reflex urge to maintain normal pulmonary mechanics. This may explain the increased incidence of postoperative atelectasis following large doses of narcotics. Since severe postoperative pain must be alleviated, measures to reduce or prevent pulmonary complications should be considered. These include vigorous encouragement to do breathing exercises, use of forced deep inspiration with bag and mask, and regional anesthesia to block pain locally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-488
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume188
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 11 1964
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Atelectasis
Morphine
Respiration
Breathing Exercises
Lung
Conduction Anesthesia
Narcotics
Postoperative Pain
Masks
Mechanics
Abdominal Pain
Ventilation
Reflex
Healthy Volunteers
Gases
Pain
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effect of Morphine on Breathing Pattern : A Possible Factor in Atelectasis. / Egbert, L. D.; Bendixen, H. H.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 188, No. 6, 11.05.1964, p. 485-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Egbert, L. D. ; Bendixen, H. H. / Effect of Morphine on Breathing Pattern : A Possible Factor in Atelectasis. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1964 ; Vol. 188, No. 6. pp. 485-488.
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