Effect of maternal antenatal and newborn supplementation with Vitamin A on cognitive development of school-aged children in rural Bangladesh: A follow-up of a placebo-controlled, randomized trial

Hasmot Ali, Jena Hamadani, Sucheta Mehra, Fahmida Tofail, Md Imrul Hasan, Saijuddin Shaikh, Abu Ahmed Shamim, Lee S.F. Wu, Keith P. West, Parul Christian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The impact of early Vitamin A supplementation on neurodevelopmental function has not been adequately studied. In rural Bangladesh we examined cognitive and motor function and scholastic achievement in a cohort of children who were exposed to Vitamin A in utero or at birth. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine independent and combined effects of antenatal and newborn supplementation with Vitamin A on the cognitive function of children at 8 y of age. Design: A cohort of rural Bangladeshi children from 2 previous double-blind, placebo-controlled cluster-randomized trials were revisited at age 8 y between February 2013 and June 2014. Data on sociodemographic, social, and physical conditions; schooling; child care behavior; anthropometric measures; and cognitive function were collected with the use of various psychometric assessment tools. Results: Among 11,950 children from the parent trial who were last known to be alive, a subset of 1803 children balanced by treatment group in a selected contiguous study area were re-enrolled and 1613 (89%) provided consent for assessments. Of these, 1577 (87%) children had a complete cognitive evaluation. All groups were highly comparable on baseline variables collected in the previous trials and factors measured at re-enrollment. Overall, there was no impact of either maternal or newborn supplementation with Vitamin A on intelligence, memory, and motor function. Compared with placebo, children who received both interventions had significantly better performance in reading, spelling, and math computation, with increased mean (95% CI) scores of 8.0 (2.2, 13.8), 6.8 (1.9, 11.7), and 4.8 (0.6, 9.0), respectively. Conclusions: General intelligence or memory and motor functions were not affected by antenatal or newborn supplementation with Vitamin A. Scholastic performance and aspects of executive function improved when both interventions were provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-87
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • Cognitive function
  • Newborn
  • Prenatal
  • Scholastic performance
  • Vitamin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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