Effect of host genetics on the development of cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with AIDS

Efe Sezgin, Douglas A. Jabs, Sher L. Hendrickson, Mark Van Natta, Alexander Zdanov, Richard Alan Lewis, Michael W. Smith, Jennifer L. Troyer, Stephen J. O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is a common opportunistic infection among patients with AIDS and still causes visual morbidity despite the wide spread usage of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The ubiquitous CMV pathogen contains a human interleukin-10 (IL-10) homolog in its genome and utilizes it to evade host immune reactions through an IL-10 receptor mediated immune-suppression pathway. Methods. Effects of IL-10R1, IL-10 and previously described AIDS restriction gene variants are investigated on the development of CMV retinitis in the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA) cohort (n = 1284). Results. In European Americans (n = 750), a haplotype carrying an amino acid changing variation in the cytoplasmic domain (S420L) of IL-10R1 can be protective (OR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.02-0.94; P = .04) against, whereas another haplotype carrying an amino acid changing variation in the extracellular domain (I224V) of IL-10R1 can be more susceptible (OR, 6.21; 95% CI, 1.22- 31.54; P = .03) to CMV retinitis. In African Americans (n = 534), potential effects of IL-10 variants are observed. Conclusion. Host genetics may have a role in the occurrence of CMV retinitis in patients infected with HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)606-613
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume202
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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