Effect of handwashing on child health: A randomised controlled trial

Stephen P. Luby, Mubina Agboatwalla, Daniel R. Feikin, John Painter, Ward Billhimer, Arshad Altaf, Robert M. Hoekstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: More than 3·5 million children aged less than 5 years die from diarrhoea and acute lower respiratory-tract infection every year. We undertook a randomised controlled trial to assess the effect of handwashing promotion with soap on the incidence of acute respiratory infection, impetigo, and diarrhoea. Methods: In adjoining squatter settlements in Karachi, Pakistan, we randomly assigned 25 neighbourhoods to handwashing promotion; 11 neighbourhoods (306 households) were randomised as controls. In neighbourhoods with handwashing promotion, 300 households each were assigned to antibacterial soap containing 1·2% triclocarban and to plain soap. Fieldworkers visited households weekly for 1 year to encourage handwashing by residents in soap households and to record symptoms in all households. Primary study outcomes were diarrhoea, impetigo, and acute respiratory-tract infections (ie, the number of new episodes of illness per person-weeks at risk). Pneumonia was defined according to the WHO clinical case definition. Analysis was by intention to treat. Findings: Children younger than 5 years in households that received plain soap and handwashing promotion had a 50% lower incidence of pneumonia than controls (95% CI (-65% to -34%). Also compared with controls, children younger than 15 years in households with plain soap had a 53% lower incidence of diarrhoea (-65% to -41%) and a 34% lower incidence of impetigo (-52% to -16%). Incidence of disease did not differ significantly between households given plain soap compared with those given antibacterial soap. Interpretation: Handwashing with soap prevents the two clinical syndromes that cause the largest number of childhood deaths globally - namely, diarrhoea and acute lower respiratory infections. Handwashing with daily bathing also prevents impetigo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-233
Number of pages9
JournalLancet
Volume366
Issue number9481
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 16 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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