Effect of enteral glutamine or glycine on whole-body nitrogen kinetics in very-low-birth-weight infants

Prabhu Parimi, Srisatish Devapatla, Lourdes L. Gruca, Saeid B. Amini, Richard W. Hanson, Satish C. Kalhan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Glutamine is a critical amino acid for the metabolism of enterocytes, lymphocytes, and other proliferating cells. Although supplementation with glutamine has been suggested for growing infants, its effect on protein metabolism has not been examined. Objective: The objective was to examine the effect of enteral glutamine or glycine on whole-body kinetics of glutamine, phenylalanine, leucine, and urea in preterm infants. Design: Infants at -1·d -1; n = 9) or isonitrogenous amounts of glycine (n = 9) for 5 d. Eight infants fed unsupplemented formula served as control subjects. Glutamine, phenylalanine, leucine nitrogen flux, leucine carbon flux, and urea kinetics were quantified during a basal fasting period and in response to nutrient intake. Results: Growing preterm infants had a high weight-specific rate of appearance of glutamine, phenylalanine, and leucine nitrogen flux. When compared with the control treatment, enteral glutamine resulted in a high rate of urea synthesis, no change in the plasma glutamine concentration, and no change in the rate of appearance of glutamine. Glycine supplementation resulted in similar changes in nitrogen metabolism, but the magnitude of change was less than that in the glutamine group. In the nonsupplemented infants, the rate of appearance of leucine nitrogen flux was negatively correlated (p = -0.72) with urea synthesis. In contrast, the correlation (p = 0.75) was positive in the glutamine group. Conclusion: Enterally administered glutamine in growing preterm infants is entirely metabolized in the gut and does not have a discernable effect on whole-body protein and nitrogen kinetics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-409
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume79
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2004

Fingerprint

Very Low Birth Weight Infant
low birth weight
Glutamine
glycine (amino acid)
glutamine
Glycine
Small Intestine
Nitrogen
kinetics
nitrogen
Leucine
leucine
Urea
urea
Phenylalanine
Premature Infants
phenylalanine
Carbon Cycle
synthesis
Enterocytes

Keywords

  • Glutamine
  • Glycine
  • Growth
  • Leucine
  • Phenylalanine
  • Premature infants
  • Reamination
  • Urea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Parimi, P., Devapatla, S., Gruca, L. L., Amini, S. B., Hanson, R. W., & Kalhan, S. C. (2004). Effect of enteral glutamine or glycine on whole-body nitrogen kinetics in very-low-birth-weight infants. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 79(3), 402-409.

Effect of enteral glutamine or glycine on whole-body nitrogen kinetics in very-low-birth-weight infants. / Parimi, Prabhu; Devapatla, Srisatish; Gruca, Lourdes L.; Amini, Saeid B.; Hanson, Richard W.; Kalhan, Satish C.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 79, No. 3, 03.2004, p. 402-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parimi, P, Devapatla, S, Gruca, LL, Amini, SB, Hanson, RW & Kalhan, SC 2004, 'Effect of enteral glutamine or glycine on whole-body nitrogen kinetics in very-low-birth-weight infants', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 79, no. 3, pp. 402-409.
Parimi, Prabhu ; Devapatla, Srisatish ; Gruca, Lourdes L. ; Amini, Saeid B. ; Hanson, Richard W. ; Kalhan, Satish C. / Effect of enteral glutamine or glycine on whole-body nitrogen kinetics in very-low-birth-weight infants. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2004 ; Vol. 79, No. 3. pp. 402-409.
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AU - Hanson, Richard W.

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