Effect of dietary patterns on measures of lipid peroxidation: Results from a randomized clinical trial

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Abstract

Background-Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to lipids is thought to be an important process in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although previous studies have demonstrated a beneficial impact of antioxidant vitamin supplements on lipid peroxidation, the effect of dietary patterns on lipid peroxidation is unknown. Methods and Results-During the 3-week run-in period of a randomized trial, 123 healthy individuals were fed a control diet, low in fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, with 37% of calories from fat. Participants were then randomized to consume for 8 weeks: (1) the control diet, (2) a diet rich in fruits and vegetables but otherwise similar to the control diet, and (3) a combination diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low- fat dairy products and reduced in fat. Serum oxygen radical-absorbing capacity, malondialdehyde (an in vitro measure of lipid peroxidation), and breath ethane (an in vivo measure of lipid peroxidation) were measured at the end of run-in and intervention periods. Between run-in and intervention, mean (95% CI) change in oxygen radical-absorbing capacity (U/mL) was -35 (-93, 13) in the control diet, 26 (-15, 67) in the fruits and vegetables diet (P=0.06 compared with control), and 19 (-22, 54) in the combination diet (P=0.10 compared with control). Median (interquartile range) change in ethane was 0.84 (0.10, 1.59) in the control diet, 0.02 (-0.61, 0.83) in the fruits and vegetables diet (P=0.04 compared with control), and -1.00 (-1.97, 0.25) in the combination diet (P=0.005 compared with control). Change in malondialdehyde did not differ between diets. Conclusions-This study demonstrates that modification of diet can favorably affect serum antioxidant capacity and protect against lipid peroxidation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2390-2395
Number of pages6
JournalCirculation
Volume98
Issue number22
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

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Lipid Peroxidation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Diet
Fruit
Vegetables
Ethane
Dairy Products
Fats
Malondialdehyde
Reactive Oxygen Species
Antioxidants
Diet Therapy
Serum
Vitamins
Free Radicals
Atherosclerosis
Lipids

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Diet
  • Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{6f65c4fa432f490498a2bd0f6cd55b42,
title = "Effect of dietary patterns on measures of lipid peroxidation: Results from a randomized clinical trial",
abstract = "Background-Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to lipids is thought to be an important process in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although previous studies have demonstrated a beneficial impact of antioxidant vitamin supplements on lipid peroxidation, the effect of dietary patterns on lipid peroxidation is unknown. Methods and Results-During the 3-week run-in period of a randomized trial, 123 healthy individuals were fed a control diet, low in fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, with 37{\%} of calories from fat. Participants were then randomized to consume for 8 weeks: (1) the control diet, (2) a diet rich in fruits and vegetables but otherwise similar to the control diet, and (3) a combination diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low- fat dairy products and reduced in fat. Serum oxygen radical-absorbing capacity, malondialdehyde (an in vitro measure of lipid peroxidation), and breath ethane (an in vivo measure of lipid peroxidation) were measured at the end of run-in and intervention periods. Between run-in and intervention, mean (95{\%} CI) change in oxygen radical-absorbing capacity (U/mL) was -35 (-93, 13) in the control diet, 26 (-15, 67) in the fruits and vegetables diet (P=0.06 compared with control), and 19 (-22, 54) in the combination diet (P=0.10 compared with control). Median (interquartile range) change in ethane was 0.84 (0.10, 1.59) in the control diet, 0.02 (-0.61, 0.83) in the fruits and vegetables diet (P=0.04 compared with control), and -1.00 (-1.97, 0.25) in the combination diet (P=0.005 compared with control). Change in malondialdehyde did not differ between diets. Conclusions-This study demonstrates that modification of diet can favorably affect serum antioxidant capacity and protect against lipid peroxidation.",
keywords = "Antioxidants, Atherosclerosis, Diet, Lipids",
author = "Miller, {Edgar R} and Lawrence Appel and Risby, {Terence H}",
year = "1998",
month = "12",
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language = "English (US)",
volume = "98",
pages = "2390--2395",
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T1 - Effect of dietary patterns on measures of lipid peroxidation

T2 - Results from a randomized clinical trial

AU - Miller, Edgar R

AU - Appel, Lawrence

AU - Risby, Terence H

PY - 1998/12/1

Y1 - 1998/12/1

N2 - Background-Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to lipids is thought to be an important process in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although previous studies have demonstrated a beneficial impact of antioxidant vitamin supplements on lipid peroxidation, the effect of dietary patterns on lipid peroxidation is unknown. Methods and Results-During the 3-week run-in period of a randomized trial, 123 healthy individuals were fed a control diet, low in fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, with 37% of calories from fat. Participants were then randomized to consume for 8 weeks: (1) the control diet, (2) a diet rich in fruits and vegetables but otherwise similar to the control diet, and (3) a combination diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low- fat dairy products and reduced in fat. Serum oxygen radical-absorbing capacity, malondialdehyde (an in vitro measure of lipid peroxidation), and breath ethane (an in vivo measure of lipid peroxidation) were measured at the end of run-in and intervention periods. Between run-in and intervention, mean (95% CI) change in oxygen radical-absorbing capacity (U/mL) was -35 (-93, 13) in the control diet, 26 (-15, 67) in the fruits and vegetables diet (P=0.06 compared with control), and 19 (-22, 54) in the combination diet (P=0.10 compared with control). Median (interquartile range) change in ethane was 0.84 (0.10, 1.59) in the control diet, 0.02 (-0.61, 0.83) in the fruits and vegetables diet (P=0.04 compared with control), and -1.00 (-1.97, 0.25) in the combination diet (P=0.005 compared with control). Change in malondialdehyde did not differ between diets. Conclusions-This study demonstrates that modification of diet can favorably affect serum antioxidant capacity and protect against lipid peroxidation.

AB - Background-Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to lipids is thought to be an important process in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although previous studies have demonstrated a beneficial impact of antioxidant vitamin supplements on lipid peroxidation, the effect of dietary patterns on lipid peroxidation is unknown. Methods and Results-During the 3-week run-in period of a randomized trial, 123 healthy individuals were fed a control diet, low in fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, with 37% of calories from fat. Participants were then randomized to consume for 8 weeks: (1) the control diet, (2) a diet rich in fruits and vegetables but otherwise similar to the control diet, and (3) a combination diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low- fat dairy products and reduced in fat. Serum oxygen radical-absorbing capacity, malondialdehyde (an in vitro measure of lipid peroxidation), and breath ethane (an in vivo measure of lipid peroxidation) were measured at the end of run-in and intervention periods. Between run-in and intervention, mean (95% CI) change in oxygen radical-absorbing capacity (U/mL) was -35 (-93, 13) in the control diet, 26 (-15, 67) in the fruits and vegetables diet (P=0.06 compared with control), and 19 (-22, 54) in the combination diet (P=0.10 compared with control). Median (interquartile range) change in ethane was 0.84 (0.10, 1.59) in the control diet, 0.02 (-0.61, 0.83) in the fruits and vegetables diet (P=0.04 compared with control), and -1.00 (-1.97, 0.25) in the combination diet (P=0.005 compared with control). Change in malondialdehyde did not differ between diets. Conclusions-This study demonstrates that modification of diet can favorably affect serum antioxidant capacity and protect against lipid peroxidation.

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KW - Atherosclerosis

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