Effect of demographic factors, urinary peak flow rates, and Boyarsky Symptom scores on patient treatment choice in benign prostatic hyperplasia

Steven A. Kaplan, Erik T. Goluboff, Carl A. Olsson, Patricia A. Deverka, Joseph J. Chmiel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abstract. Objectives: To determine the effect of patient's age, race, Boyarsky score, and urinary flow rate on type of treatment selected for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and to evaluate maintenance of treatment at 1 -year follow-up. Methods: Subjects in this prospective study, conducted in a referral center prostate clinic, were 174 consecutive patients, aged 67.6 ± 10.8 years (mean ± SD), with previously untreated BPH. Patients underwent structured interviews and uroflowmetry, then completed the Boyarsky Symptom Index. Blinded to these data, one physician described four treatment categories in a nonjudgmental fashion, always using the same order: watchful waiting; finasteride and alpha-blocker; thermal therapy, balloon dilation, and a prostate stent; and transurethral prostate resection. Treatment choice was entirely that of the patient. Independent variables were patient's age, race, symptom score, and uroflow; the dependent variable was treatment choice. At 1 year, the same physician interviewed patients to evaluate maintenance of therapy. Results: Only symptom score and flow rate were predictive of treatment choice, high scores and low flow being associated with more aggressive treatment choices (P = 0.001). Most patients, regardless of symptom severity, chose interventions less aggressive than surgery and more aggressive than watchful waiting. At 1 year, 85% of patients continued to be maintained on their original treatment. Conclusions: Men with mild or moderate BPH prefer interventions of moderate aggressiveness; race and age make little or no difference. If maintenance of treatment indicates patient satisfaction, most patients appear to remain satisfied with therapy they select.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)398-405
Number of pages8
JournalUrology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Prostatic Hyperplasia
Demography
Therapeutics
Watchful Waiting
Prostate
Finasteride
Physicians
Transurethral Resection of Prostate
Patient Satisfaction
Stents
Dilatation
Referral and Consultation
Hot Temperature
Maintenance
Prospective Studies
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Effect of demographic factors, urinary peak flow rates, and Boyarsky Symptom scores on patient treatment choice in benign prostatic hyperplasia. / Kaplan, Steven A.; Goluboff, Erik T.; Olsson, Carl A.; Deverka, Patricia A.; Chmiel, Joseph J.

In: Urology, Vol. 45, No. 3, 01.01.1995, p. 398-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaplan, Steven A. ; Goluboff, Erik T. ; Olsson, Carl A. ; Deverka, Patricia A. ; Chmiel, Joseph J. / Effect of demographic factors, urinary peak flow rates, and Boyarsky Symptom scores on patient treatment choice in benign prostatic hyperplasia. In: Urology. 1995 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 398-405.
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