Effect of cyclosporine on rubella virus-specific immune responses in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

Avindra Nath, Jerry S. Wolinsky, Ronald H. Kerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cyclosporine A (CsA) has been used in putative autoimmune diseases after sensitization to unknown antigens. We have previously shown that CsA prevented continued activation of T-cells in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (CPMS) patients. The current study was undertaken to determine whether CsA, CsA and prednisone (CsA + P) could suppress immune responses to a common recall antigen. Serum antibody levels were higher in all CPMS patients than age-matched normal controls. However, rubella antibody titers in the CsA or CsA + P groups were no different from a placebo-treated CPMS patient group. The lymphocyte responses to inactivated rubella virus of CsA and CsA + P-treated CPMS patients were lower than placebo and control but not statistically different. Therapy with bot CSA and CSA + P was associated with significantly lower panel mixed leukocyte responses and Ta1 expression than in the placebo-treated group; CD3, CD4, CD8 antigen expression and active rosette formation by T-cells were similar for the three CPMS groups. These results suggest that while CsA exerts measurable effects on non-specific indicators of cellular immunity in CPMS patients, it may not be as effective in suppressing pre-existent specific immune responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-148
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
Rubella virus
Cyclosporine
Placebos
CD8 Antigens
T-Lymphocytes
Rosette Formation
Antigens
CD4 Antigens
Prednisone
Cellular Immunity
Autoimmune Diseases
Leukocytes
Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • Ciclosporin A
  • Immunity
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Rubella virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Effect of cyclosporine on rubella virus-specific immune responses in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. / Nath, Avindra; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Kerman, Ronald H.

In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, Vol. 22, No. 2, 1989, p. 143-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nath, Avindra ; Wolinsky, Jerry S. ; Kerman, Ronald H. / Effect of cyclosporine on rubella virus-specific immune responses in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In: Journal of Neuroimmunology. 1989 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 143-148.
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