Effect of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition on in vitro B-cell function after burn injury

Hiromasa Yamamoto, Soranit Siltharm, Suzan DeSerres, Charles Hultman, Anthony A. Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The role of PGE2 in suppression of B-cell function after burn injury was investigated. Splenocytes from burned or sham-burned mice were isolated 8 days after born injury and cultured with lipopolysaccharide with or without the addition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or indomethacin (Indo). Anti- peptidoglycan polysaccharide immunoglobulin (Ig)M (specific antibody to a bacterial antigen), total IgM, and total IgG levels in culture supernatant and lymphocyte proliferation were measured. All B-cell functions were significantly suppressed by burn injury. PGE2 suppressed all B-cell functions except fur IgG synthesis. Indo restored anti-peptidoglycan polysaccharide IgM to normal levels, but did not have a significant effect on suppressed proliferation and total IgM synthesis. IgG synthesis was increased by PGE2 and inhibited by Indo. Although nut all B-cell suppression was accounted for by PGE2, this prostaglandin appeared to be a mechanism responsible for impaired antigen specific antibody response and isotype switching. Successful restoration of specific antibody synthesis to bacterial antigen suggests a potential therapeutic role for a cyclo-oxygenase blocking agent after burn injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)612-621
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Dinoprostone
B-Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulin M
Indomethacin
Wounds and Injuries
Bacterial Antigens
Peptidoglycan
Immunoglobulin G
Polysaccharides
Immunoglobulin Class Switching
Nuts
Antibodies
Prostaglandins
Antibody Formation
Lipopolysaccharides
In Vitro Techniques
Lymphocytes
Antigens
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • B-cell
  • Bacterial infection
  • Burn injury
  • Indomethacin
  • Prostaglandin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Effect of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition on in vitro B-cell function after burn injury. / Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Siltharm, Soranit; DeSerres, Suzan; Hultman, Charles; Meyer, Anthony A.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 41, No. 4, 01.10.1996, p. 612-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamamoto, Hiromasa ; Siltharm, Soranit ; DeSerres, Suzan ; Hultman, Charles ; Meyer, Anthony A. / Effect of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition on in vitro B-cell function after burn injury. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 1996 ; Vol. 41, No. 4. pp. 612-621.
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