Effect of cocaine, lidocaine kindling and carbamazepine on batrachotoxin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat brain slices

Russell L. Margolis, De Maw Chuang, Douglas Dick, Susan R.B. Weiss, Robert M. Post

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Repeated administration of a subconvulsant dose of a local anesthetic will eventually induce seizures, a phenomenon similar to electrical kindling. We have investigated the effect of repeated lidocaine and cocaine administration on the phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis induced by batrachotoxin (BTX), a specific Na channel activator. Rats were injected with cocaine or saline daily for 6 days and PI hydrolysis was assayed in sliced frontal cortex. Cocaine treatment had no effect on BTX-induced PI hydrolysis while in vitro cocaine blocked the BTX effect. In a second experiment, rats received daily injections of lidocaine or saline. After a rat developed at least two seizures, it was sacrificed together with a rat receiving lidocaine injections which had never seized and a rat receiving saline injections. Basal, BTX and ibotenic acid (IBO; a glutamate receptor agonist)-stimulated PI hydrolysis did not differ among the three groups in slices of either hippocampus (HC) or piriform cortex (PC) though IBO-stimulated PI hydrolysis was mucg greater in the HC than in the PC. Neither in vitro nor in vivo carbamazepine altered the effect of cocaine on BTX-induced PI hydrolysis. These results demonstrate that local anesthetic kindling does not alter PI hydrolysis coupled to Na channel or IBO activation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-190
Number of pages6
JournalBrain research
Volume614
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 18 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anesthetic
  • Batrachotoxin
  • Cocaine
  • Ibotenate
  • Kindling
  • Lidocaine
  • Na
  • Phosphoinositide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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