Effect of alcohol consumption on all-cause and liver-related mortality among HIV-infected individuals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to examine the association between levels of past and current alcohol consumption and all-cause and liver-related mortality among people living with HIV (PLWH). Methods: A prospective cohort study of 1855 PLWH in Baltimore, MD was carried out from 2000 to 2013. We ascertained alcohol use by (1) self-report (SR) through a computer-assisted self interview, and (2) medical record abstraction of provider-documented (PD) alcohol use. SR alcohol consumption was categorized as heavy (men: > 4 drinks/day or > 14 drinks/week; women: > 3 drinks/day or > 7 drinks/week), moderate (any alcohol consumption less than heavy), and none. We calculated the cumulative incidence of liver-related mortality and fitted adjusted cause-specific regression models to account for competing risks. Results: All-cause and liver-related mortality rates (MRs) were 43.0 and 7.2 per 1000 person-years (PY), respectively. All-cause mortality was highest among SR nondrinkers with PD recent (< 6 months) heavy drinking (MR = 85.4 deaths/1000 PY) and lowest among SR moderate drinkers with no PD history of heavy drinking (MR = 23.0 deaths/1000 PY). Compared with SR moderate drinkers with no PD history of heavy drinking, SR nondrinkers and moderate drinkers with PD recent heavy drinking had higher liver-related mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 7.28 and 3.52, respectively]. However, SR nondrinkers and moderate drinkers with a PD drinking history of > 6 months ago showed similar rates of liver-related mortality (HR = 1.06 and 2.00, respectively). Conclusions: Any heavy alcohol consumption was associated with all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals, while only recent heavy consumption was associated with liver-related mortality. Because mortality risk among nondrinkers varies substantially by drinking history, current consumption alone is insufficient to assess risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHIV Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

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Alcohol Drinking
HIV
Mortality
Liver
Self Report
Alcohols
Baltimore
Drinking
Medical Records
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Interviews
Incidence

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Alcohol consumption
  • All-cause mortality
  • Liver-related mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{63411754ce4242479aa25b18a0028a3e,
title = "Effect of alcohol consumption on all-cause and liver-related mortality among HIV-infected individuals",
abstract = "Objectives: The aim of the study was to examine the association between levels of past and current alcohol consumption and all-cause and liver-related mortality among people living with HIV (PLWH). Methods: A prospective cohort study of 1855 PLWH in Baltimore, MD was carried out from 2000 to 2013. We ascertained alcohol use by (1) self-report (SR) through a computer-assisted self interview, and (2) medical record abstraction of provider-documented (PD) alcohol use. SR alcohol consumption was categorized as heavy (men: > 4 drinks/day or > 14 drinks/week; women: > 3 drinks/day or > 7 drinks/week), moderate (any alcohol consumption less than heavy), and none. We calculated the cumulative incidence of liver-related mortality and fitted adjusted cause-specific regression models to account for competing risks. Results: All-cause and liver-related mortality rates (MRs) were 43.0 and 7.2 per 1000 person-years (PY), respectively. All-cause mortality was highest among SR nondrinkers with PD recent (< 6 months) heavy drinking (MR = 85.4 deaths/1000 PY) and lowest among SR moderate drinkers with no PD history of heavy drinking (MR = 23.0 deaths/1000 PY). Compared with SR moderate drinkers with no PD history of heavy drinking, SR nondrinkers and moderate drinkers with PD recent heavy drinking had higher liver-related mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 7.28 and 3.52, respectively]. However, SR nondrinkers and moderate drinkers with a PD drinking history of > 6 months ago showed similar rates of liver-related mortality (HR = 1.06 and 2.00, respectively). Conclusions: Any heavy alcohol consumption was associated with all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals, while only recent heavy consumption was associated with liver-related mortality. Because mortality risk among nondrinkers varies substantially by drinking history, current consumption alone is insufficient to assess risk.",
keywords = "HIV, Alcohol consumption, All-cause mortality, Liver-related mortality",
author = "Canan, {C. E.} and Lau, {Bryan M} and McCaul, {Mary Elizabeth} and Keruly, {Jeanne C} and Moore, {Richard D} and Geetanjali Chander",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/hiv.12433",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "HIV Medicine",
issn = "1464-2662",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of alcohol consumption on all-cause and liver-related mortality among HIV-infected individuals

AU - Canan, C. E.

AU - Lau, Bryan M

AU - McCaul, Mary Elizabeth

AU - Keruly, Jeanne C

AU - Moore, Richard D

AU - Chander, Geetanjali

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Objectives: The aim of the study was to examine the association between levels of past and current alcohol consumption and all-cause and liver-related mortality among people living with HIV (PLWH). Methods: A prospective cohort study of 1855 PLWH in Baltimore, MD was carried out from 2000 to 2013. We ascertained alcohol use by (1) self-report (SR) through a computer-assisted self interview, and (2) medical record abstraction of provider-documented (PD) alcohol use. SR alcohol consumption was categorized as heavy (men: > 4 drinks/day or > 14 drinks/week; women: > 3 drinks/day or > 7 drinks/week), moderate (any alcohol consumption less than heavy), and none. We calculated the cumulative incidence of liver-related mortality and fitted adjusted cause-specific regression models to account for competing risks. Results: All-cause and liver-related mortality rates (MRs) were 43.0 and 7.2 per 1000 person-years (PY), respectively. All-cause mortality was highest among SR nondrinkers with PD recent (< 6 months) heavy drinking (MR = 85.4 deaths/1000 PY) and lowest among SR moderate drinkers with no PD history of heavy drinking (MR = 23.0 deaths/1000 PY). Compared with SR moderate drinkers with no PD history of heavy drinking, SR nondrinkers and moderate drinkers with PD recent heavy drinking had higher liver-related mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 7.28 and 3.52, respectively]. However, SR nondrinkers and moderate drinkers with a PD drinking history of > 6 months ago showed similar rates of liver-related mortality (HR = 1.06 and 2.00, respectively). Conclusions: Any heavy alcohol consumption was associated with all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals, while only recent heavy consumption was associated with liver-related mortality. Because mortality risk among nondrinkers varies substantially by drinking history, current consumption alone is insufficient to assess risk.

AB - Objectives: The aim of the study was to examine the association between levels of past and current alcohol consumption and all-cause and liver-related mortality among people living with HIV (PLWH). Methods: A prospective cohort study of 1855 PLWH in Baltimore, MD was carried out from 2000 to 2013. We ascertained alcohol use by (1) self-report (SR) through a computer-assisted self interview, and (2) medical record abstraction of provider-documented (PD) alcohol use. SR alcohol consumption was categorized as heavy (men: > 4 drinks/day or > 14 drinks/week; women: > 3 drinks/day or > 7 drinks/week), moderate (any alcohol consumption less than heavy), and none. We calculated the cumulative incidence of liver-related mortality and fitted adjusted cause-specific regression models to account for competing risks. Results: All-cause and liver-related mortality rates (MRs) were 43.0 and 7.2 per 1000 person-years (PY), respectively. All-cause mortality was highest among SR nondrinkers with PD recent (< 6 months) heavy drinking (MR = 85.4 deaths/1000 PY) and lowest among SR moderate drinkers with no PD history of heavy drinking (MR = 23.0 deaths/1000 PY). Compared with SR moderate drinkers with no PD history of heavy drinking, SR nondrinkers and moderate drinkers with PD recent heavy drinking had higher liver-related mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 7.28 and 3.52, respectively]. However, SR nondrinkers and moderate drinkers with a PD drinking history of > 6 months ago showed similar rates of liver-related mortality (HR = 1.06 and 2.00, respectively). Conclusions: Any heavy alcohol consumption was associated with all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals, while only recent heavy consumption was associated with liver-related mortality. Because mortality risk among nondrinkers varies substantially by drinking history, current consumption alone is insufficient to assess risk.

KW - HIV

KW - Alcohol consumption

KW - All-cause mortality

KW - Liver-related mortality

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U2 - 10.1111/hiv.12433

DO - 10.1111/hiv.12433

M3 - Article

C2 - 27679418

AN - SCOPUS:84995404238

JO - HIV Medicine

JF - HIV Medicine

SN - 1464-2662

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