Effect of age on thyroid hormone physiology and function

S. R. Gambert, P. D. Tsitouras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aging process in both experimental animals and man is associated with a variety of changes in thyroid hormone physiology and function. Unfortunately, data obtained from animal studies are not always easily comparable to data obtained from studies of humans, and conflicting studies make interpretation and clinical correlation difficult. What is known, however, is that symptoms of hyperthyroidism in the elderly are often atypical, with apathetic thyrotoxicosis representing the extreme. Hypothyroidism, on the other hand, despite the fact that presenting signs and symptoms change little with age, is often not diagnosed because of difficulty in distinghuising clinical findings. Although no data currently exist on cost-effectiveness, an argument can be made for yearly screening for thyroid abnormalities in the geriatric population. A determination of serum free T4 and TSH would help in most cases to define thyroid status. Further testing is clearly indicated, however, if clinical suspicion is high or screening test results return either in the borderline or the abnormal range. Once a problem is suspected, both the interpretation of diagnostic laboratory tests and necessary treatment must reflect a proper understanding of thyroid hormone physiology as modified by age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)360-365
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume33
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thyroid Hormones
Thyroid Gland
Thyrotoxicosis
Hyperthyroidism
Hypothyroidism
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Geriatrics
Signs and Symptoms
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Serum
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Effect of age on thyroid hormone physiology and function. / Gambert, S. R.; Tsitouras, P. D.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 33, No. 5, 1985, p. 360-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gambert, SR & Tsitouras, PD 1985, 'Effect of age on thyroid hormone physiology and function', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 33, no. 5, pp. 360-365.
Gambert, S. R. ; Tsitouras, P. D. / Effect of age on thyroid hormone physiology and function. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 1985 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 360-365.
@article{3c58f0bab12244d5870a2ae332c42411,
title = "Effect of age on thyroid hormone physiology and function",
abstract = "The aging process in both experimental animals and man is associated with a variety of changes in thyroid hormone physiology and function. Unfortunately, data obtained from animal studies are not always easily comparable to data obtained from studies of humans, and conflicting studies make interpretation and clinical correlation difficult. What is known, however, is that symptoms of hyperthyroidism in the elderly are often atypical, with apathetic thyrotoxicosis representing the extreme. Hypothyroidism, on the other hand, despite the fact that presenting signs and symptoms change little with age, is often not diagnosed because of difficulty in distinghuising clinical findings. Although no data currently exist on cost-effectiveness, an argument can be made for yearly screening for thyroid abnormalities in the geriatric population. A determination of serum free T4 and TSH would help in most cases to define thyroid status. Further testing is clearly indicated, however, if clinical suspicion is high or screening test results return either in the borderline or the abnormal range. Once a problem is suspected, both the interpretation of diagnostic laboratory tests and necessary treatment must reflect a proper understanding of thyroid hormone physiology as modified by age.",
author = "Gambert, {S. R.} and Tsitouras, {P. D.}",
year = "1985",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "360--365",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of age on thyroid hormone physiology and function

AU - Gambert, S. R.

AU - Tsitouras, P. D.

PY - 1985

Y1 - 1985

N2 - The aging process in both experimental animals and man is associated with a variety of changes in thyroid hormone physiology and function. Unfortunately, data obtained from animal studies are not always easily comparable to data obtained from studies of humans, and conflicting studies make interpretation and clinical correlation difficult. What is known, however, is that symptoms of hyperthyroidism in the elderly are often atypical, with apathetic thyrotoxicosis representing the extreme. Hypothyroidism, on the other hand, despite the fact that presenting signs and symptoms change little with age, is often not diagnosed because of difficulty in distinghuising clinical findings. Although no data currently exist on cost-effectiveness, an argument can be made for yearly screening for thyroid abnormalities in the geriatric population. A determination of serum free T4 and TSH would help in most cases to define thyroid status. Further testing is clearly indicated, however, if clinical suspicion is high or screening test results return either in the borderline or the abnormal range. Once a problem is suspected, both the interpretation of diagnostic laboratory tests and necessary treatment must reflect a proper understanding of thyroid hormone physiology as modified by age.

AB - The aging process in both experimental animals and man is associated with a variety of changes in thyroid hormone physiology and function. Unfortunately, data obtained from animal studies are not always easily comparable to data obtained from studies of humans, and conflicting studies make interpretation and clinical correlation difficult. What is known, however, is that symptoms of hyperthyroidism in the elderly are often atypical, with apathetic thyrotoxicosis representing the extreme. Hypothyroidism, on the other hand, despite the fact that presenting signs and symptoms change little with age, is often not diagnosed because of difficulty in distinghuising clinical findings. Although no data currently exist on cost-effectiveness, an argument can be made for yearly screening for thyroid abnormalities in the geriatric population. A determination of serum free T4 and TSH would help in most cases to define thyroid status. Further testing is clearly indicated, however, if clinical suspicion is high or screening test results return either in the borderline or the abnormal range. Once a problem is suspected, both the interpretation of diagnostic laboratory tests and necessary treatment must reflect a proper understanding of thyroid hormone physiology as modified by age.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021848014&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021848014&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 360

EP - 365

JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

SN - 0002-8614

IS - 5

ER -