Effect of a Recombinant CD4-IgG on In Vitro T Helper Cell Function: Data from a Phase I/II Study of Patients with AIDS

Mario Clerici, Robert Yarchoan, Stephen Blatt, Craig W. Hendrix, Arthur J. Ammann, Samuel Broder, Gene M. Shearer, Mario Clerici, Robert Yarchoan, Stephen Blatt, Craig W. Hendrix, Arthur J. Ammann, Samuel Broder, Gene M. Shearer, Mario Clerici, Robert Yarchoan, Stephen Blatt, Craig W. Hendrix, Arthur J. Ammann, Samuel BroderGene M. Shearer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Ten patients with AIDS were enrolled in a phase I/II protocol of recombinant CD4-IgG (rCD4-IgG) treatment. Patients’ peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) were tested before, during, and after therapy with rCD4-IgG for T helper (TH) cell function assessed by antigen- and mitogen- stimulated proliferation and interleukin-2 production in response to influenza A virus, allogeneic PBL (alloantigens), and phytohemagglutinin. Although clinical benefit was not evident, rCD4-lgG treatment was associated with rapid and potent improved TH cell function for two of three stimuli tested in 90% of the patients. These data are complemented by an in vitro experimental model that demonstrates the opposing immunologic effects ofrgp120 and rCD4-lgG on TH cell function of PBL from uninfected individuals. Thus, restoration of TH cell function by rCD4-lgG in the absence ofincreased CD4 cell counts could be due to removal ofan immunosuppressive factor, possibly gp120. These findings suggest that rCD4-lgG can induce partial restoration of immune function in AIDS patients, even in the absence of apparent short-term clinical benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1012-1016
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume168
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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