EEG spectra in severely dyslexic men: rest and word and design recognition

Judith M. Rumsey, Richard Coppola, Martha B. Denckla, Susan D. Hamburger, Markus J.P. Kruesi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To identify and localize differences in brain functioning, electrical activity was recorded with a full complement of scalp electrodes in 14 healthy, severely dyslexic men (mean age = 22 years, S.D. = 3) and 15 matched controls during rest and during word and design recognition. The electroencephalograms were spectrum analyzed, and the mean amplitude in each of 5 bands - delta, theta, alpha, slow beta and fast beta - compared topographically between conditions and groups. The two tasks did not elicit differentially lateralized patterns of electrical activity, but produced anteroposterior differences in alpha and theta. The Designs tasks, more difficult for both groups, was associated with less posterior alpha than was the Words task. The strongest group difference was likewise seen along an anteroposterior axis on the Designs task. With performance equal to that of controls, the dyslexics showed relatively greater fronto-central theta and less posterior theta (a more activated state), suggesting that dyslexics were compensating for less efficient information processing. There were no group differences in overall amplitude in any band for any condition. The differences in the topographical distribution of theta may reflect subtle differences in brain organization or compensatory recruitment of widely distributed neuronal networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-40
Number of pages11
JournalElectroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1989

Keywords

  • Design task
  • EEG spectral Dyslexic men
  • Rest condition
  • Verbal task

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'EEG spectra in severely dyslexic men: rest and word and design recognition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this