Educating the future public health workforce: Do schools of public health teach students about the private sector?

Helaine Rutkow, Arielle Traub, Rachel Howard, Shannon Frattaroli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Recent surveys indicate that approximately 40% of graduates from schools of public health are employed within the private sector or have an employer charged with regulating the private sector. These data suggest that schools of public health should provide curricular opportunities for their students-the future public health workforce-to learn about the relationship between the private sector and the public's health. Objective: To identify opportunities for graduate students in schools of public health to select course work that educates them about the relationship between the private sector and public health. Design: We systematically identified and analyzed data gathered from publicly available course titles and descriptions on the Web sites of accredited schools of public health. Setting: Data were collected in the United States. Participants: The sample consisted of accredited schools of public health. Main Outcome Measures: Descriptions of the number and types of courses that schools of public health offer about the private sector and identification of how course descriptions frame the private sector relative to public health. Results: We identified 104 unique courses with content about the private sector's relationship to public health. More than 75% of accredited schools of public health offered at least 1 such course. Nearly 25% of identified courses focused exclusively on the health insurance industry. Qualitative analysis of the data revealed 5 frames used to describe the private sector, including its role as a stakeholder in the policy process. Conclusions: Schools of public health face a curricular gap, with relatively few course offerings that teach students about the relationship between the private sector and the public's health. By developing new courses or revising existing ones, schools of public health can expose the future public health workforce to the varied ways public health professionals interact with the private sector, and potentially influence students' career paths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-52
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Public Health Management and Practice
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

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Public Health Students
Health Manpower
Public Health Schools
Private Sector
Public Health
Students
Health Insurance

Keywords

  • curricula
  • public health education
  • public health practice
  • schools of public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Educating the future public health workforce: Do schools of public health teach students about the private sector?",
abstract = "Context: Recent surveys indicate that approximately 40{\%} of graduates from schools of public health are employed within the private sector or have an employer charged with regulating the private sector. These data suggest that schools of public health should provide curricular opportunities for their students-the future public health workforce-to learn about the relationship between the private sector and the public's health. Objective: To identify opportunities for graduate students in schools of public health to select course work that educates them about the relationship between the private sector and public health. Design: We systematically identified and analyzed data gathered from publicly available course titles and descriptions on the Web sites of accredited schools of public health. Setting: Data were collected in the United States. Participants: The sample consisted of accredited schools of public health. Main Outcome Measures: Descriptions of the number and types of courses that schools of public health offer about the private sector and identification of how course descriptions frame the private sector relative to public health. Results: We identified 104 unique courses with content about the private sector's relationship to public health. More than 75{\%} of accredited schools of public health offered at least 1 such course. Nearly 25{\%} of identified courses focused exclusively on the health insurance industry. Qualitative analysis of the data revealed 5 frames used to describe the private sector, including its role as a stakeholder in the policy process. Conclusions: Schools of public health face a curricular gap, with relatively few course offerings that teach students about the relationship between the private sector and the public's health. By developing new courses or revising existing ones, schools of public health can expose the future public health workforce to the varied ways public health professionals interact with the private sector, and potentially influence students' career paths.",
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