Editorial: Bugs and drugs: Insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

Geoffrey C. Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The dysbiosis hypothesis posits that perturbations in the gut microbiome may contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A recent Canadian population-based study has shown an association between new-onset IBD and antibiotic use in the 2-5 years preceding diagnosis. Though these findings do not establish a causal relationship, it supports the role of dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of IBD. Furthermore, the study reinforces the importance of the judicious use of antibiotics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2143-2145
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume106
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Dysbiosis
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Editorial : Bugs and drugs: Insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. / Nguyen, Geoffrey C.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 106, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 2143-2145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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