Ectopic ureteroceles in duplex systems

Long-term follow up and 'treatment-free' status

Ming Hsien Wang, Saul P. Greenfield, Pierre Williot, John Rutkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Definitive treatment of ectopic ureterocele (EU) implies that no further surgery or prophylactic antibiotic is needed. The literature is unclear on which interventions render a child 'treatment free'. Materials and methods: Thirty (23 female, seven male) patients presented between 1984 and 2000. Follow up ranged from 5 to 15 years (mean: 7). Presenting reasons were: urinary tract infection in 18 (16 females, two males; age: 17 <6 months, one 2 years), prenatal ultrasound in 11 (seven females, four males), and renal failure in one (male, aged 3 weeks). Results: Treatment was as follows. No intervention, three (10%). Single procedure, eight (27%): five hemi-nephrectomy (HN), two transurethral incisions (TUI), one excision and re-implantation (E&R). Two procedures, 14 (47%): first procedure 10 TUI, 4 HN; second procedure 13 E&R, 1 TUI. Three procedures, three (10%): first 2 TUI, 1 HN; second 3 TUI; third 2 E&R, 1 HN. Four procedures, two (7%): first 2 TUI; second 1 HN, 1 TUI; third 2 TUI; fourth 2 E&R. Eight (27%) remained on prophylaxis: two had no intervention, in 4 the ectopic ureterocele was in situ after HN or TUI, and two had reflux after E&R. Twenty two (73%) came off prophylaxis (16 E&R, 4 HN, 1 TUI, 1 observation). Poorly or non-functioning upper pole moieties were left in place in 14/18 who underwent E&R. Conclusion: 'Treatment-free' status most often requires ureterocele excision. HN alone can be definitive, while TUI alone is so rarely. Poor or non-functioning upper pole segments can remain after E&R. Children with collapsed ureteroceles in situ often must remain on antibiotic prophylaxis. A staged approach with initial TUI, followed by E&R, was successful in definitively treating the majority.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-187
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Urology
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Ureterocele
Nephrectomy
Therapeutics
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Urinary Tract Infections
Renal Insufficiency
Observation
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • Duplex systems
  • Ectopic ureterocele
  • Urinary tract infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Ectopic ureteroceles in duplex systems : Long-term follow up and 'treatment-free' status. / Wang, Ming Hsien; Greenfield, Saul P.; Williot, Pierre; Rutkowski, John.

In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 06.2008, p. 183-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Ming Hsien ; Greenfield, Saul P. ; Williot, Pierre ; Rutkowski, John. / Ectopic ureteroceles in duplex systems : Long-term follow up and 'treatment-free' status. In: Journal of Pediatric Urology. 2008 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 183-187.
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abstract = "Objective: Definitive treatment of ectopic ureterocele (EU) implies that no further surgery or prophylactic antibiotic is needed. The literature is unclear on which interventions render a child 'treatment free'. Materials and methods: Thirty (23 female, seven male) patients presented between 1984 and 2000. Follow up ranged from 5 to 15 years (mean: 7). Presenting reasons were: urinary tract infection in 18 (16 females, two males; age: 17 <6 months, one 2 years), prenatal ultrasound in 11 (seven females, four males), and renal failure in one (male, aged 3 weeks). Results: Treatment was as follows. No intervention, three (10{\%}). Single procedure, eight (27{\%}): five hemi-nephrectomy (HN), two transurethral incisions (TUI), one excision and re-implantation (E&R). Two procedures, 14 (47{\%}): first procedure 10 TUI, 4 HN; second procedure 13 E&R, 1 TUI. Three procedures, three (10{\%}): first 2 TUI, 1 HN; second 3 TUI; third 2 E&R, 1 HN. Four procedures, two (7{\%}): first 2 TUI; second 1 HN, 1 TUI; third 2 TUI; fourth 2 E&R. Eight (27{\%}) remained on prophylaxis: two had no intervention, in 4 the ectopic ureterocele was in situ after HN or TUI, and two had reflux after E&R. Twenty two (73{\%}) came off prophylaxis (16 E&R, 4 HN, 1 TUI, 1 observation). Poorly or non-functioning upper pole moieties were left in place in 14/18 who underwent E&R. Conclusion: 'Treatment-free' status most often requires ureterocele excision. HN alone can be definitive, while TUI alone is so rarely. Poor or non-functioning upper pole segments can remain after E&R. Children with collapsed ureteroceles in situ often must remain on antibiotic prophylaxis. A staged approach with initial TUI, followed by E&R, was successful in definitively treating the majority.",
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