Economic value of norovirus outbreak control measures in healthcare settings

Bruce Lee, Z. S. Wettstein, S. M. Mcglone, R. R. Bailey, C. A. Umscheid, K. J. Smith, R. R. Muder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although norovirus is a significant cause of nosocomial viral gastroenteritis, the economic value of hospital outbreak containment measures following identification of a norovirus case is currently unknown. We developed computer simulation models to determine the potential cost-savings from the hospital perspective of implementing the following norovirus outbreak control interventions: (i) increased hand hygiene measures, (ii) enhanced disinfection practices, (iii) patient isolation, (iv) use of protective apparel, (v) staff exclusion policies, and (vi) ward closure. Sensitivity analyses explored the impact of varying intervention efficacy, number of initial norovirus cases, the norovirus reproductive rate (R0), and room, ward size, and occupancy. Implementing increased hand hygiene, using protective apparel, staff exclusion policies or increased disinfection separately or in bundles provided net cost-savings, even when the intervention was only 10% effective in preventing further norovirus transmission. Patient isolation or ward closure was cost-saving only when transmission prevention efficacy was very high (≥90%), and their economic value decreased as the number of beds per room and the number of empty beds per ward increased. Increased hand hygiene, using protective apparel or increased disinfection practices separately or in bundles are the most cost-saving interventions for the control and containment of a norovirus outbreak.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)640-646
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Norovirus
Disease Outbreaks
Economics
Delivery of Health Care
Hand Hygiene
Disinfection
Patient Isolation
Cost Savings
Computer Simulation
Hospital Economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Gastroenteritis

Keywords

  • Economics
  • Hospital
  • Infection control
  • Interventions
  • Norovirus
  • Outbreak

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Lee, B., Wettstein, Z. S., Mcglone, S. M., Bailey, R. R., Umscheid, C. A., Smith, K. J., & Muder, R. R. (2011). Economic value of norovirus outbreak control measures in healthcare settings. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 17(4), 640-646. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2010.03345.x

Economic value of norovirus outbreak control measures in healthcare settings. / Lee, Bruce; Wettstein, Z. S.; Mcglone, S. M.; Bailey, R. R.; Umscheid, C. A.; Smith, K. J.; Muder, R. R.

In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, Vol. 17, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 640-646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, B, Wettstein, ZS, Mcglone, SM, Bailey, RR, Umscheid, CA, Smith, KJ & Muder, RR 2011, 'Economic value of norovirus outbreak control measures in healthcare settings', Clinical Microbiology and Infection, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 640-646. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2010.03345.x
Lee, Bruce ; Wettstein, Z. S. ; Mcglone, S. M. ; Bailey, R. R. ; Umscheid, C. A. ; Smith, K. J. ; Muder, R. R. / Economic value of norovirus outbreak control measures in healthcare settings. In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection. 2011 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 640-646.
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