Early Patient-Reported Outcomes Predict 3-Year Outcomes in Operatively Treated Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity

Amit Jain, Khaled M. Kebaish, Daniel M. Sciubba, Hamid Hassanzadeh, Justin K. Scheer, Brian J. Neuman, Virginie Lafage, Shay Bess, Themistocles S. Protopsaltis, Douglas C. Burton, Justin S. Smith, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Richard A. Hostin, Christopher P. Ames

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background For patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD), surgical treatment may improve their health-related quality of life. This study investigates when the greatest improvement in outcomes occurs and whether incremental improvements in patient-reported outcomes during the first postoperative year predict outcomes at 3 years. Methods Using a multicenter registry, we identified 84 adults with ASD treated surgically from 2008 to 2012 with complete 3-year follow-up. Pairwise t tests and multivariate regression were used for analysis. Significance was set at P < 0.01. Results Mean Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Scoliosis Research Society-22r total (SRS-22r) scores improved by 13 and 0.8 points, respectively, from preoperatively to 3 years (both P < 0.001). From preoperatively to 6 weeks postoperatively, ODI scores worsened by 5 points (P = 0.049) and SRS-22r scores improved by 0.3 points (P < 0.001). Between 6 weeks and 1 year, ODI and SRS-22r scores improved by 19 and 0.5 points, respectively (both P < 0.001). Incremental improvements during the first postoperative year predicted 3-year outcomes in ODI and SRS-22r scores (adjusted R2 = 0.52 and 0.42, respectively). There were no significant differences in the measured or predicted 3-year ODI (P = 0.991) or SRS-22r scores (P = 0.986). Conclusions In surgically treated patients with ASD, the greatest improvements in outcomes occurred between 6 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. A model with incremental improvements from baseline to 6 weeks and from 6 weeks to 1 year can be used to predict ODI and SRS-22r scores at 3 years.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages258-262
Number of pages5
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume102
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Scoliosis
Research
Registries
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • Adult spinal deformity
  • Oswestry Disability Index
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Scoliosis Research Society-22r

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Early Patient-Reported Outcomes Predict 3-Year Outcomes in Operatively Treated Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity. / Jain, Amit; Kebaish, Khaled M.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Scheer, Justin K.; Neuman, Brian J.; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S.; Burton, Douglas C.; Smith, Justin S.; Shaffrey, Christopher I.; Hostin, Richard A.; Ames, Christopher P.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 102, 01.06.2017, p. 258-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jain, A, Kebaish, KM, Sciubba, DM, Hassanzadeh, H, Scheer, JK, Neuman, BJ, Lafage, V, Bess, S, Protopsaltis, TS, Burton, DC, Smith, JS, Shaffrey, CI, Hostin, RA & Ames, CP 2017, 'Early Patient-Reported Outcomes Predict 3-Year Outcomes in Operatively Treated Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity' World Neurosurgery, vol. 102, pp. 258-262. DOI: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.03.003
Jain, Amit ; Kebaish, Khaled M. ; Sciubba, Daniel M. ; Hassanzadeh, Hamid ; Scheer, Justin K. ; Neuman, Brian J. ; Lafage, Virginie ; Bess, Shay ; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S. ; Burton, Douglas C. ; Smith, Justin S. ; Shaffrey, Christopher I. ; Hostin, Richard A. ; Ames, Christopher P./ Early Patient-Reported Outcomes Predict 3-Year Outcomes in Operatively Treated Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity. In: World Neurosurgery. 2017 ; Vol. 102. pp. 258-262
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AU - Sciubba,Daniel M.

AU - Hassanzadeh,Hamid

AU - Scheer,Justin K.

AU - Neuman,Brian J.

AU - Lafage,Virginie

AU - Bess,Shay

AU - Protopsaltis,Themistocles S.

AU - Burton,Douglas C.

AU - Smith,Justin S.

AU - Shaffrey,Christopher I.

AU - Hostin,Richard A.

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N2 - Background For patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD), surgical treatment may improve their health-related quality of life. This study investigates when the greatest improvement in outcomes occurs and whether incremental improvements in patient-reported outcomes during the first postoperative year predict outcomes at 3 years. Methods Using a multicenter registry, we identified 84 adults with ASD treated surgically from 2008 to 2012 with complete 3-year follow-up. Pairwise t tests and multivariate regression were used for analysis. Significance was set at P < 0.01. Results Mean Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Scoliosis Research Society-22r total (SRS-22r) scores improved by 13 and 0.8 points, respectively, from preoperatively to 3 years (both P < 0.001). From preoperatively to 6 weeks postoperatively, ODI scores worsened by 5 points (P = 0.049) and SRS-22r scores improved by 0.3 points (P < 0.001). Between 6 weeks and 1 year, ODI and SRS-22r scores improved by 19 and 0.5 points, respectively (both P < 0.001). Incremental improvements during the first postoperative year predicted 3-year outcomes in ODI and SRS-22r scores (adjusted R2 = 0.52 and 0.42, respectively). There were no significant differences in the measured or predicted 3-year ODI (P = 0.991) or SRS-22r scores (P = 0.986). Conclusions In surgically treated patients with ASD, the greatest improvements in outcomes occurred between 6 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. A model with incremental improvements from baseline to 6 weeks and from 6 weeks to 1 year can be used to predict ODI and SRS-22r scores at 3 years.

AB - Background For patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD), surgical treatment may improve their health-related quality of life. This study investigates when the greatest improvement in outcomes occurs and whether incremental improvements in patient-reported outcomes during the first postoperative year predict outcomes at 3 years. Methods Using a multicenter registry, we identified 84 adults with ASD treated surgically from 2008 to 2012 with complete 3-year follow-up. Pairwise t tests and multivariate regression were used for analysis. Significance was set at P < 0.01. Results Mean Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Scoliosis Research Society-22r total (SRS-22r) scores improved by 13 and 0.8 points, respectively, from preoperatively to 3 years (both P < 0.001). From preoperatively to 6 weeks postoperatively, ODI scores worsened by 5 points (P = 0.049) and SRS-22r scores improved by 0.3 points (P < 0.001). Between 6 weeks and 1 year, ODI and SRS-22r scores improved by 19 and 0.5 points, respectively (both P < 0.001). Incremental improvements during the first postoperative year predicted 3-year outcomes in ODI and SRS-22r scores (adjusted R2 = 0.52 and 0.42, respectively). There were no significant differences in the measured or predicted 3-year ODI (P = 0.991) or SRS-22r scores (P = 0.986). Conclusions In surgically treated patients with ASD, the greatest improvements in outcomes occurred between 6 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. A model with incremental improvements from baseline to 6 weeks and from 6 weeks to 1 year can be used to predict ODI and SRS-22r scores at 3 years.

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