Early-life enteric infections

Relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children

Reinaldo B. Oriá, Laura E. Murray-Kolb, Rebecca J. Scharf, Laura L. Pendergast, Dennis R. Lang, Glynis L. Kolling, Richard L. Guerrant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The intestinal microbiota undergoes active remodeling in the first 6 to 18 months of life, during which time the characteristics of the adult microbiota are developed. This process is strongly influenced by the early diet and enteric pathogens. Enteric infections and malnutrition early in life may favor microbiota dysbiosis and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, resulting in intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of intestinal bacterial products, ultimately leading to low-grade, chronic, subclinical systemic inflammation. The leaky gut-derived low-grade systemic inflammation may have profound consequences on the gut-liver-brain axis, compromising normal growth, metabolism, and cognitive development. This review examines recent data suggesting that early-life enteric infections that lead to intestinal barrier disruption may shift the intestinal microbiota toward chronic systemic inflammation and subsequent impaired cognitive development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)374-386
Number of pages13
JournalNutrition Reviews
Volume74
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognition
Microbiota
Inflammation
Infection
Dysbiosis
Bacterial Translocation
Malnutrition
Diet
Liver
Brain
Growth
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Enteric infections
  • Environmental enteropathy
  • Intestinal microbiome
  • Malnutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Oriá, R. B., Murray-Kolb, L. E., Scharf, R. J., Pendergast, L. L., Lang, D. R., Kolling, G. L., & Guerrant, R. L. (2016). Early-life enteric infections: Relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children. Nutrition Reviews, 74(6), 374-386. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuw008

Early-life enteric infections : Relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children. / Oriá, Reinaldo B.; Murray-Kolb, Laura E.; Scharf, Rebecca J.; Pendergast, Laura L.; Lang, Dennis R.; Kolling, Glynis L.; Guerrant, Richard L.

In: Nutrition Reviews, Vol. 74, No. 6, 2016, p. 374-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oriá, RB, Murray-Kolb, LE, Scharf, RJ, Pendergast, LL, Lang, DR, Kolling, GL & Guerrant, RL 2016, 'Early-life enteric infections: Relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children', Nutrition Reviews, vol. 74, no. 6, pp. 374-386. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuw008
Oriá, Reinaldo B. ; Murray-Kolb, Laura E. ; Scharf, Rebecca J. ; Pendergast, Laura L. ; Lang, Dennis R. ; Kolling, Glynis L. ; Guerrant, Richard L. / Early-life enteric infections : Relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children. In: Nutrition Reviews. 2016 ; Vol. 74, No. 6. pp. 374-386.
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