Early life eczema, food introduction, and risk of food allergy in children

Rajesh Kumar, Deanna M. Caruso, Lester Arguelles, Jennifer S. Kim, Angela Schroeder, Brooke Rowland, Katie E. Meyer, Kristin E. Schwarz, Jennafer S. Birne, Fengxiu Ouyang, Jacqueline A. Pongracic, Xiaobin Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effect of food introduction timing on the development of food allergy remains controversial. We sought to examine whether the presence of childhood eczema changes the relationship between timing of food introduction and food allergy. The analysis includes 960 children recruited as part of a family-based food allergy cohort. Food allergy was determined by objective symptoms developing within 2 hours of ingestion, corroborated by skin prick testing/specific IgE. Physician diagnosis of eczema and timing of formula and solid food introduction were obtained by standardized interview. Cox Regression analysis provided hazard ratios for the development of food allergy for the same subgroups. Logistic regression models estimated the association of eczema and formula/food introduction with the risk of food allergy, individually and jointly. Of the 960 children, 411 (42.8%) were allergic to 1 or more foods and 391 (40.7%) had eczema. Children with eczema had a 8.4-fold higher risk of food allergy (OR, 95% CI: 8.4, 5.9-12.1). Among all children, later (>6 months) formula and rice/wheat cereal introduction lowered the risk of food allergy. In joint analysis, children without eczema who had later formula (OR, 95% CI: 0.5, 0.3-0.9) and later (>1 year) solid food (OR, 95% CI: 0.5, 0.3-0.95) introduction had a lower risk of food allergy. Among children with eczema, timing of food or formula introduction did not modify the risk of developing food allergy. Later food introduction was protective for food allergy in children without eczema but did not alter the risk of developing food allergy in children with eczema.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-182
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Food Hypersensitivity
Eczema
Food
Logistic Models
Immunoglobulin E
Triticum
Eating
Regression Analysis
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Early life eczema, food introduction, and risk of food allergy in children. / Kumar, Rajesh; Caruso, Deanna M.; Arguelles, Lester; Kim, Jennifer S.; Schroeder, Angela; Rowland, Brooke; Meyer, Katie E.; Schwarz, Kristin E.; Birne, Jennafer S.; Ouyang, Fengxiu; Pongracic, Jacqueline A.; Wang, Xiaobin.

In: Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.09.2010, p. 175-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kumar, R, Caruso, DM, Arguelles, L, Kim, JS, Schroeder, A, Rowland, B, Meyer, KE, Schwarz, KE, Birne, JS, Ouyang, F, Pongracic, JA & Wang, X 2010, 'Early life eczema, food introduction, and risk of food allergy in children', Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 175-182. https://doi.org/10.1089/ped.2010.0014
Kumar, Rajesh ; Caruso, Deanna M. ; Arguelles, Lester ; Kim, Jennifer S. ; Schroeder, Angela ; Rowland, Brooke ; Meyer, Katie E. ; Schwarz, Kristin E. ; Birne, Jennafer S. ; Ouyang, Fengxiu ; Pongracic, Jacqueline A. ; Wang, Xiaobin. / Early life eczema, food introduction, and risk of food allergy in children. In: Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology. 2010 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 175-182.
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