Early experiences with e-health services (1999-2002): Promise, reality, and implications

Vicki Fung, Eduardo Ortiz, Jie Huang, Bruce Fireman, Robert Miller, Joseph V. Selby, John Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: E-health services may improve the quality and efficiency of care; however, there is little quantitative data on e-health use. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine trends in e-health use and user characteristics. Research Design: This was a longitudinal study of e-health use (1999-2002) within an integrated delivery system (IDS). We classified 4 e-health services into transactional (drug refills and appointment scheduling) and care-related (medical and medication advice) services. Subjects: Approximately 3.3 million members of a large, prepaid IDS. Measurements: Amount and frequency of e-health use over time and characteristics of users. Results: The number of members registered for access to e-health increased from 20,617 (0.7% of all members) in Q1 1999 to 270,987 (8.6%) in Q3 2002. Between Q1 and Q3 2002, 42,845 members (1.3%) used the drug refill service and 55,901 (1.7%) used the appointment scheduling service compared with 10,756 members (0.3%) who used the medical advice service and 3069 (0.1%) who used the medication advice service. Over the same period, transactional service users averaged 3.5 uses/user versus 1.6 uses/user among care-related service users. Members most likely to use e-health services had a high level of clinical need, a regular primary care provider, were 30 to 64 years old, female, white, and lived in a nonlow socioeconomic status neighborhood. These findings were consistent across e-health service types. Conclusions: Although use of all e-health services grew rapidly, use of care-related services lagged significantly behind use of transactional services. Subjects with greater clinical need and better ties to the health system were more likely to use both types of e-health services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-496
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Care
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Services
health service
Health
Integrated Delivery of Health Care
experience
health
Appointments and Schedules
scheduling
Quality of Health Care
medication
Social Class
Pharmaceutical Preparations
drug
Longitudinal Studies
Primary Health Care
Research Design
research planning
social status
longitudinal study
efficiency

Keywords

  • e-health
  • Health services
  • Integrated delivery system
  • Internet
  • Online

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Fung, V., Ortiz, E., Huang, J., Fireman, B., Miller, R., Selby, J. V., & Hsu, J. (2006). Early experiences with e-health services (1999-2002): Promise, reality, and implications. Medical Care, 44(5), 491-496. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.mlr.0000207917.28988.dd

Early experiences with e-health services (1999-2002) : Promise, reality, and implications. / Fung, Vicki; Ortiz, Eduardo; Huang, Jie; Fireman, Bruce; Miller, Robert; Selby, Joseph V.; Hsu, John.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 44, No. 5, 05.2006, p. 491-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fung, V, Ortiz, E, Huang, J, Fireman, B, Miller, R, Selby, JV & Hsu, J 2006, 'Early experiences with e-health services (1999-2002): Promise, reality, and implications', Medical Care, vol. 44, no. 5, pp. 491-496. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.mlr.0000207917.28988.dd
Fung, Vicki ; Ortiz, Eduardo ; Huang, Jie ; Fireman, Bruce ; Miller, Robert ; Selby, Joseph V. ; Hsu, John. / Early experiences with e-health services (1999-2002) : Promise, reality, and implications. In: Medical Care. 2006 ; Vol. 44, No. 5. pp. 491-496.
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