Early events in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection: Photosensitivity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-treated virions

N. DeLuca, D. Bzik, S. Person, W. Snipes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Herpes simplex virus type 1 is photosensitized by treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The inactivation of FITC-treated virions upon subsequent exposure to light is inhibited by the presence of sodium azide, suggesting the involvement of singlet oxygen in the process. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that treatment with FITC plus light induces crosslinks in viral envelope glycoproteins. Treatment of virions with high concentrations of FITC (50 μg/ml) plus light causes a reduction in the adsorption of the virus to monolayers of human embryonic lung cells. For lower concentrations of FITC (10 μg/ml) plus light, treated virions adsorb to the host cells, but remain sensitive to light until entry occurs. The loss of light sensitivity coincides with the development of resistance to antibodies. The results are most consistent with a mechanism of entry for herpes simplex virus involving fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane of the host cell.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)912-916
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume78
Issue number2 II
DOIs
StatePublished - 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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