Early avoidance of traumatic stimuli predicts chronicity of intrusive thoughts following burn injury

John Warren Lawrence, James Fauerbach, Andrew Munster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The role of avoidance behavior in perpetuating the experience of intrusive thoughts among burn survivors was investigated. The Impact of Events Scale (IES), which has subscales that measure the frequency of intrusive thoughts and avoidance behavior, was administered to burn survivors (n = 23) upon discharge and four months later. Both avoidance behavior and intrusive thoughts at discharge were significantly related to experiencing intrusive thoughts at four months (r = 0.59, P < 0.003, r = 0.45, P < 0.03, respectively). In a hierarchical regression analysis controlling for intrusive thoughts at discharge, avoidance behavior continued to significantly predict intrusive thoughts at four months [B = 0.43, t(20) = 2.9, P < 0.009]. Limitations of the study and implications for treatment are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)643-646
Number of pages4
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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