Early Alzheimer's disease-type pathology in the frontal cortex of wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei)

Sylvia E. Perez, Chet C. Sherwood, Michael R. Cranfield, Joseph M. Erwin, Antoine Mudakikwa, Patrick R. Hof, Elliott J. Mufson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Amyloid beta (Aβ) and tau pathology have been described in the brains of captive aged great apes, but the natural progression of these age-related pathologies from wild great apes, including the gorilla, is unknown. In our previous study of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) who were housed in American Zoos and Aquariums-accredited facilities, we found an age-related increase in Aβ-positive plaques and vasculature, tau-positive astrocytes, oligodendrocyte coiled bodies, and neuritic clusters in the neocortex as well as hippocampus in older animals. Here, we demonstrate that aged wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei), who spent their entire lives in their natural habitat, also display an age-related increase in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and/or Aβ-immunoreactive blood vessels and plaques, but very limited tau pathology, in the frontal cortex. These results indicate that Aβ and tau lesions are age-related events that occur in the brain of gorillas living in captivity and in the wild.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-201
Number of pages7
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume39
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gorilla gorilla
Frontal Lobe
Alzheimer Disease
Pathology
Hominidae
Coiled Bodies
Serum Amyloid A Protein
Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor
Neocortex
Oligodendroglia
Brain
Amyloid
Astrocytes
Ecosystem
Blood Vessels
Hippocampus

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Amyloid
  • Cerebral cortex
  • Pathology
  • Tau
  • Wild great apes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Aging
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Perez, S. E., Sherwood, C. C., Cranfield, M. R., Erwin, J. M., Mudakikwa, A., Hof, P. R., & Mufson, E. J. (2016). Early Alzheimer's disease-type pathology in the frontal cortex of wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei). Neurobiology of Aging, 39, 195-201. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.12.017

Early Alzheimer's disease-type pathology in the frontal cortex of wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei). / Perez, Sylvia E.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Cranfield, Michael R.; Erwin, Joseph M.; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Hof, Patrick R.; Mufson, Elliott J.

In: Neurobiology of Aging, Vol. 39, 01.03.2016, p. 195-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perez, Sylvia E. ; Sherwood, Chet C. ; Cranfield, Michael R. ; Erwin, Joseph M. ; Mudakikwa, Antoine ; Hof, Patrick R. ; Mufson, Elliott J. / Early Alzheimer's disease-type pathology in the frontal cortex of wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei). In: Neurobiology of Aging. 2016 ; Vol. 39. pp. 195-201.
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