E-cigarettes as a source of toxic and potentially carcinogenic metals

Catherine Ann Hess, Pablo Olmedo, Ana Navas Acien, Walter Goessler, Joanna E Cohen, Ana M Rule

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and aims The popularity of electronic cigarette devices is growing worldwide. The health impact of e-cigarette use, however, remains unclear. E-cigarettes are marketed as a safer alternative to cigarettes. The aim of this research was the characterization and quantification of toxic metal concentrations in five, nationally popular brands of cig-a-like e-cigarettes. Methods We analyzed the cartomizer liquid in 10 cartomizer refills for each of five brands by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results All of the tested metals (cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese and nickel) were found in the e-liquids analyzed. Across all analyzed brands, mean (SD) concentrations ranged from 4.89 (0.893) to 1970 (1540) μg/L for lead, 53.9 (6.95) to 2110 (5220) μg/L for chromium and 58.7 (22.4) to 22,600 (24,400) μg/L for nickel. Manganese concentrations ranged from 28.7 (9.79) to 6910.2 (12,200) μg/L. We found marked variability in nickel and chromium concentration within and between brands, which may come from heating elements. Conclusion Additional research is needed to evaluate whether e-cigarettes represent a relevant exposure pathway for toxic metals in users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-225
Number of pages5
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume152
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Poisons
Tobacco Products
chromium
nickel
Chromium
Nickel
Metals
manganese
metal
Manganese
liquid
health impact
cadmium
mass spectrometry
Cadmium
Research
Heating
heating
plasma
Electric heating elements

Keywords

  • Carcinogens
  • Electronic nicotine delivery devices
  • Non-cigarette tobacco products

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

E-cigarettes as a source of toxic and potentially carcinogenic metals. / Hess, Catherine Ann; Olmedo, Pablo; Navas Acien, Ana; Goessler, Walter; Cohen, Joanna E; Rule, Ana M.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 152, 01.01.2017, p. 221-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hess, Catherine Ann ; Olmedo, Pablo ; Navas Acien, Ana ; Goessler, Walter ; Cohen, Joanna E ; Rule, Ana M. / E-cigarettes as a source of toxic and potentially carcinogenic metals. In: Environmental Research. 2017 ; Vol. 152. pp. 221-225.
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