E-Ana and e-Mia: A content analysis of pro-eating disorder web sites

Dina L G Borzekowski, Summer Schenk, Jenny L. Wilson, Rebecka Peebles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. The Internet offers Web sites that describe, endorse, and support eating disorders. We examined the features of pro-eating disorder Web sites and the messages to which users may be exposed. Methods. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 180 active Web sites, noting site logistics, site accessories, "thinspiration" material (images and prose intended to inspire weight loss), tips and tricks, recovery, themes, and perceived harm. Results. Practically all (91 %) of the Web sites were open to the public, and most (79%) had interactive features. A large majority (84%) offered pro-anorexia content, and 64% provided pro-bulimia content. Few sites focused on eating disorders as a lifestyle choice. Thinspiration material appeared on 85% of the sites, and 83% provided overt suggestions on how to engage in eatingdisordered behaviors. Thirty-eight percent of the sites included recovery-oriented information or links. Common themes were success, control, perfection, and solidarity. Conclusions. Pro-eating disorder Web sites present graphic material to encourage, support, and motivate site users to continue their efforts with anorexia and bulimia. Continued monitoring will offer a valuable foundation to build a better understanding of the effects of these sites on their users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1526-1534
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume100
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bulimia
Anorexia
Internet
Life Style
Weight Loss
Catalytic Domain
Feeding and Eating Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Borzekowski, D. L. G., Schenk, S., Wilson, J. L., & Peebles, R. (2010). E-Ana and e-Mia: A content analysis of pro-eating disorder web sites. American Journal of Public Health, 100(8), 1526-1534. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2009.172700

E-Ana and e-Mia : A content analysis of pro-eating disorder web sites. / Borzekowski, Dina L G; Schenk, Summer; Wilson, Jenny L.; Peebles, Rebecka.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 100, No. 8, 01.08.2010, p. 1526-1534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borzekowski, DLG, Schenk, S, Wilson, JL & Peebles, R 2010, 'E-Ana and e-Mia: A content analysis of pro-eating disorder web sites', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 100, no. 8, pp. 1526-1534. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2009.172700
Borzekowski, Dina L G ; Schenk, Summer ; Wilson, Jenny L. ; Peebles, Rebecka. / E-Ana and e-Mia : A content analysis of pro-eating disorder web sites. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2010 ; Vol. 100, No. 8. pp. 1526-1534.
@article{b0fc2d87b15a416f8578978f85b40929,
title = "E-Ana and e-Mia: A content analysis of pro-eating disorder web sites",
abstract = "Objectives. The Internet offers Web sites that describe, endorse, and support eating disorders. We examined the features of pro-eating disorder Web sites and the messages to which users may be exposed. Methods. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 180 active Web sites, noting site logistics, site accessories, {"}thinspiration{"} material (images and prose intended to inspire weight loss), tips and tricks, recovery, themes, and perceived harm. Results. Practically all (91 {\%}) of the Web sites were open to the public, and most (79{\%}) had interactive features. A large majority (84{\%}) offered pro-anorexia content, and 64{\%} provided pro-bulimia content. Few sites focused on eating disorders as a lifestyle choice. Thinspiration material appeared on 85{\%} of the sites, and 83{\%} provided overt suggestions on how to engage in eatingdisordered behaviors. Thirty-eight percent of the sites included recovery-oriented information or links. Common themes were success, control, perfection, and solidarity. Conclusions. Pro-eating disorder Web sites present graphic material to encourage, support, and motivate site users to continue their efforts with anorexia and bulimia. Continued monitoring will offer a valuable foundation to build a better understanding of the effects of these sites on their users.",
author = "Borzekowski, {Dina L G} and Summer Schenk and Wilson, {Jenny L.} and Rebecka Peebles",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.2009.172700",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "1526--1534",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - E-Ana and e-Mia

T2 - A content analysis of pro-eating disorder web sites

AU - Borzekowski, Dina L G

AU - Schenk, Summer

AU - Wilson, Jenny L.

AU - Peebles, Rebecka

PY - 2010/8/1

Y1 - 2010/8/1

N2 - Objectives. The Internet offers Web sites that describe, endorse, and support eating disorders. We examined the features of pro-eating disorder Web sites and the messages to which users may be exposed. Methods. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 180 active Web sites, noting site logistics, site accessories, "thinspiration" material (images and prose intended to inspire weight loss), tips and tricks, recovery, themes, and perceived harm. Results. Practically all (91 %) of the Web sites were open to the public, and most (79%) had interactive features. A large majority (84%) offered pro-anorexia content, and 64% provided pro-bulimia content. Few sites focused on eating disorders as a lifestyle choice. Thinspiration material appeared on 85% of the sites, and 83% provided overt suggestions on how to engage in eatingdisordered behaviors. Thirty-eight percent of the sites included recovery-oriented information or links. Common themes were success, control, perfection, and solidarity. Conclusions. Pro-eating disorder Web sites present graphic material to encourage, support, and motivate site users to continue their efforts with anorexia and bulimia. Continued monitoring will offer a valuable foundation to build a better understanding of the effects of these sites on their users.

AB - Objectives. The Internet offers Web sites that describe, endorse, and support eating disorders. We examined the features of pro-eating disorder Web sites and the messages to which users may be exposed. Methods. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 180 active Web sites, noting site logistics, site accessories, "thinspiration" material (images and prose intended to inspire weight loss), tips and tricks, recovery, themes, and perceived harm. Results. Practically all (91 %) of the Web sites were open to the public, and most (79%) had interactive features. A large majority (84%) offered pro-anorexia content, and 64% provided pro-bulimia content. Few sites focused on eating disorders as a lifestyle choice. Thinspiration material appeared on 85% of the sites, and 83% provided overt suggestions on how to engage in eatingdisordered behaviors. Thirty-eight percent of the sites included recovery-oriented information or links. Common themes were success, control, perfection, and solidarity. Conclusions. Pro-eating disorder Web sites present graphic material to encourage, support, and motivate site users to continue their efforts with anorexia and bulimia. Continued monitoring will offer a valuable foundation to build a better understanding of the effects of these sites on their users.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77950574073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77950574073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2105/AJPH.2009.172700

DO - 10.2105/AJPH.2009.172700

M3 - Article

C2 - 20558807

AN - SCOPUS:77950574073

VL - 100

SP - 1526

EP - 1534

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 8

ER -