Dynamics of GPIIb/IIIa-mediated platelet-platelet interactions in platelet adhesion/thrombus formation on collagen in vitro as revealed by videomicroscopy

Dipti Patel, Heikki Väänänen, Markéta Jiroušková, Thomas Hoffmann, Carol Bodian, Barry S. Coller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The conventional description of platelet interactions with collagen-coated surfaces in vitro, based on serial static measurements, is that platelets first adhere and spread to form a monolayer and then recruit additional layers of platelets. To obtain dynamic information, we studied gravity-driven platelet deposition in vitro on purified type 1 collagen by video phase-contrast microscopy at 22°C. With untreated human and wild-type mouse platelets, soon after the initial adhesion of a small number of "vanguard" platelets, "follower" platelets attached to the spread-out vanguard platelets. Follower platelets then adhered to and spread onto nearby collagen or over the vanguard platelets. Thus, thrombi formed as a concerted process rather than as sequential processes. Treatment of human platelets with monoclonal antibody (mAb) 7E3 (anti-GPIIb/IIIa (αIIbβ3) + αVβ3) or tirofiban (anti-GPIIb/IIIa) did not prevent platelet adhesion but nearly eliminated the deposition of follower platelets onto vanguard platelets and platelet thrombi. Similar results were obtained with Glanzmann thrombasthenia platelets. Wild-type mouse platelets in the presence of mAb 1B5 (anti-GPIIb/IIIa) and platelets from β3-null mice behaved like human platelets in the presence of 7E3 or tirofiban. Deposition patterns of untreated human and wild-type mouse platelets were consistent with random distributions under a Poisson model, but those obtained with 7E3- and tirofiban-treated human platelets, 1B5-treated mouse platelets, or β3-null platelets demonstrated a more uniform deposition than predicted. Thus, in this model system, absence or blockade of GPIIb/IIIa receptors interferes with thrombus formation and alters the pattern of platelet deposition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-936
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume101
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Dynamics of GPIIb/IIIa-mediated platelet-platelet interactions in platelet adhesion/thrombus formation on collagen in vitro as revealed by videomicroscopy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this