Dynamic visualization of signaling activities in living cells

Michael D. Allen, Lisa M. DiPilato, Bharath Ananthanarayanan, Robert H. Newman, Qiang Ni, Jin Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The complexity and specificity of many forms of signal transduction are widely suspected to require spatial microcompartmentation and dynamic modulation of the activities of protein kinases, phosphatases, and second messengers. However, traditional methodologies for detecting signaling events, such as activation of kinases and second-messenger production and degradation, are limited in their spatiotemporal resolution and do not allow one to follow these events within the live-cell context. To achieve dynamic tracking of signaling activities in living cells, we have engineered genetically encoded fluorescent reporters for protein kinases and second messengers, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and phosphoinositides. Their development and specific examples of their application are discussed. In addition, a live-cell, high-throughput screening method has been developed for identification of new modulators that affect the dynamic activity of kinases and second messengers. Together, these reporters have the potential to provide important spatiotemporal information about the circuitry governing specific signaling events in living cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberpt6
JournalScience Signaling
Volume1
Issue number37
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2008

Fingerprint

Second Messenger Systems
Visualization
Cells
Protein Kinases
Phosphotransferases
High-Throughput Screening Assays
Signal transduction
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases
Phosphatidylinositols
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Cyclic AMP
Modulators
Signal Transduction
Screening
Chemical activation
Throughput
Modulation
Degradation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Allen, M. D., DiPilato, L. M., Ananthanarayanan, B., Newman, R. H., Ni, Q., & Zhang, J. (2008). Dynamic visualization of signaling activities in living cells. Science Signaling, 1(37), [pt6]. https://doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.137pt6

Dynamic visualization of signaling activities in living cells. / Allen, Michael D.; DiPilato, Lisa M.; Ananthanarayanan, Bharath; Newman, Robert H.; Ni, Qiang; Zhang, Jin.

In: Science Signaling, Vol. 1, No. 37, pt6, 16.09.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allen, MD, DiPilato, LM, Ananthanarayanan, B, Newman, RH, Ni, Q & Zhang, J 2008, 'Dynamic visualization of signaling activities in living cells', Science Signaling, vol. 1, no. 37, pt6. https://doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.137pt6
Allen MD, DiPilato LM, Ananthanarayanan B, Newman RH, Ni Q, Zhang J. Dynamic visualization of signaling activities in living cells. Science Signaling. 2008 Sep 16;1(37). pt6. https://doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.137pt6
Allen, Michael D. ; DiPilato, Lisa M. ; Ananthanarayanan, Bharath ; Newman, Robert H. ; Ni, Qiang ; Zhang, Jin. / Dynamic visualization of signaling activities in living cells. In: Science Signaling. 2008 ; Vol. 1, No. 37.
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