Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI for combined imaging of blood-brain barrier break down and increased blood volume in brain cancer

Xiang Xu, Kannie W Y Chan, Linda Knutsson, Dmitri Artemov, Jiadi Xu, Guanshu Liu, Yoshinori Kato, Bachchu Lal, John J Laterra, Michael T Mcmahon, Peter C Van Zijl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose Recently, natural d-glucose was suggested as a potential biodegradable contrast agent. The feasibility of using d-glucose for dynamic perfusion imaging was explored to detect malignant brain tumors based on blood brain barrier breakdown. Methods Mice were inoculated orthotopically with human U87-EGFRvIII glioma cells. Time-resolved glucose signal changes were detected using chemical exchange saturation transfer (glucoCEST) MRI. Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI was used to measure tissue response to an intravenous bolus of d-glucose. Results DGE images of mouse brains bearing human glioma showed two times higher and persistent changes in tumor compared with contralateral brain. Area-under-curve (AUC) analysis of DGE delineated blood vessels and tumor and had contrast comparable to the AUC determined using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI with GdDTPA, both showing a significantly higher AUC in tumor than in brain (P <0.005). Both CEST and relaxation effects contribute to the signal change. Conclusion DGE MRI is a feasible technique for studying brain tumor enhancement reflecting differences in tumor blood volume and permeability with respect to normal brain. We expect DGE will provide a low-risk and less expensive alternative to DCE MRI for imaging cancer in vulnerable populations, such as children and patients with renal impairment. Magn Reson Med 74:1556-1563, 2015.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1556-1563
Number of pages8
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume74
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Blood Volume
Blood-Brain Barrier
Brain Neoplasms
Glucose
Area Under Curve
Glioma
Brain
Vascular Tissue Neoplasms
Perfusion Imaging
Vulnerable Populations
Tumor Burden
Contrast Media
Permeability
Neoplasms
Kidney

Keywords

  • brain cancer
  • chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST)
  • D-glucose
  • dynamic glucose enhanced MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

@article{d94d3455655b4146bce875d72e3624b4,
title = "Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI for combined imaging of blood-brain barrier break down and increased blood volume in brain cancer",
abstract = "Purpose Recently, natural d-glucose was suggested as a potential biodegradable contrast agent. The feasibility of using d-glucose for dynamic perfusion imaging was explored to detect malignant brain tumors based on blood brain barrier breakdown. Methods Mice were inoculated orthotopically with human U87-EGFRvIII glioma cells. Time-resolved glucose signal changes were detected using chemical exchange saturation transfer (glucoCEST) MRI. Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI was used to measure tissue response to an intravenous bolus of d-glucose. Results DGE images of mouse brains bearing human glioma showed two times higher and persistent changes in tumor compared with contralateral brain. Area-under-curve (AUC) analysis of DGE delineated blood vessels and tumor and had contrast comparable to the AUC determined using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI with GdDTPA, both showing a significantly higher AUC in tumor than in brain (P <0.005). Both CEST and relaxation effects contribute to the signal change. Conclusion DGE MRI is a feasible technique for studying brain tumor enhancement reflecting differences in tumor blood volume and permeability with respect to normal brain. We expect DGE will provide a low-risk and less expensive alternative to DCE MRI for imaging cancer in vulnerable populations, such as children and patients with renal impairment. Magn Reson Med 74:1556-1563, 2015.",
keywords = "brain cancer, chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST), D-glucose, dynamic glucose enhanced MRI",
author = "Xiang Xu and Chan, {Kannie W Y} and Linda Knutsson and Dmitri Artemov and Jiadi Xu and Guanshu Liu and Yoshinori Kato and Bachchu Lal and Laterra, {John J} and Mcmahon, {Michael T} and {Van Zijl}, {Peter C}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/mrm.25995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "74",
pages = "1556--1563",
journal = "Magnetic Resonance in Medicine",
issn = "0740-3194",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI for combined imaging of blood-brain barrier break down and increased blood volume in brain cancer

AU - Xu, Xiang

AU - Chan, Kannie W Y

AU - Knutsson, Linda

AU - Artemov, Dmitri

AU - Xu, Jiadi

AU - Liu, Guanshu

AU - Kato, Yoshinori

AU - Lal, Bachchu

AU - Laterra, John J

AU - Mcmahon, Michael T

AU - Van Zijl, Peter C

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Purpose Recently, natural d-glucose was suggested as a potential biodegradable contrast agent. The feasibility of using d-glucose for dynamic perfusion imaging was explored to detect malignant brain tumors based on blood brain barrier breakdown. Methods Mice were inoculated orthotopically with human U87-EGFRvIII glioma cells. Time-resolved glucose signal changes were detected using chemical exchange saturation transfer (glucoCEST) MRI. Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI was used to measure tissue response to an intravenous bolus of d-glucose. Results DGE images of mouse brains bearing human glioma showed two times higher and persistent changes in tumor compared with contralateral brain. Area-under-curve (AUC) analysis of DGE delineated blood vessels and tumor and had contrast comparable to the AUC determined using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI with GdDTPA, both showing a significantly higher AUC in tumor than in brain (P <0.005). Both CEST and relaxation effects contribute to the signal change. Conclusion DGE MRI is a feasible technique for studying brain tumor enhancement reflecting differences in tumor blood volume and permeability with respect to normal brain. We expect DGE will provide a low-risk and less expensive alternative to DCE MRI for imaging cancer in vulnerable populations, such as children and patients with renal impairment. Magn Reson Med 74:1556-1563, 2015.

AB - Purpose Recently, natural d-glucose was suggested as a potential biodegradable contrast agent. The feasibility of using d-glucose for dynamic perfusion imaging was explored to detect malignant brain tumors based on blood brain barrier breakdown. Methods Mice were inoculated orthotopically with human U87-EGFRvIII glioma cells. Time-resolved glucose signal changes were detected using chemical exchange saturation transfer (glucoCEST) MRI. Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI was used to measure tissue response to an intravenous bolus of d-glucose. Results DGE images of mouse brains bearing human glioma showed two times higher and persistent changes in tumor compared with contralateral brain. Area-under-curve (AUC) analysis of DGE delineated blood vessels and tumor and had contrast comparable to the AUC determined using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI with GdDTPA, both showing a significantly higher AUC in tumor than in brain (P <0.005). Both CEST and relaxation effects contribute to the signal change. Conclusion DGE MRI is a feasible technique for studying brain tumor enhancement reflecting differences in tumor blood volume and permeability with respect to normal brain. We expect DGE will provide a low-risk and less expensive alternative to DCE MRI for imaging cancer in vulnerable populations, such as children and patients with renal impairment. Magn Reson Med 74:1556-1563, 2015.

KW - brain cancer

KW - chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST)

KW - D-glucose

KW - dynamic glucose enhanced MRI

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84955191642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84955191642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/mrm.25995

DO - 10.1002/mrm.25995

M3 - Article

C2 - 26404120

AN - SCOPUS:84955191642

VL - 74

SP - 1556

EP - 1563

JO - Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

JF - Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

SN - 0740-3194

IS - 6

ER -