Dynamic chromosome organization and protein localization coordinate the regulatory circuitry that drives the bacterial cell cycle

Erin D Goley, E. Toro, H. H. McAdams, L. Shapiro

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The bacterial cell has less internal structure and genetic complexity than cells of eukaryotic organisms, yet it is a highly organized system that uses both temporal and spatial cues to drive its cell cycle. Key insights into bacterial regulatory programs that orchestrate cell cycle progression have come from studies of Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium that divides asymmetrically. Three global regulatory proteins cycle out of phase with one another and drive cell cycle progression by directly controlling the expression of 200 cell-cycle-regulated genes. Exploration of this system provided insights into the evolution of regulatory circuits and the plasticity of circuit structure. The temporal expression of the modular subsystems that implement the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division is also coordinated by differential DNA methylation, regulated proteolysis, and phosphorylation signaling cascades. This control system structure has parallels to eukaryotic cell cycle control architecture. Remarkably, the transcriptional circuitry is dependent on three-dimensional dynamic deployment of key regulatory and signaling proteins. In addition, dynamically localized DNA-binding proteins ensure that DNA segregation is coupled to the timing and cellular position of the cytokinetic ring. Comparison to other organisms reveals conservation of cell cycle regulatory logic, even if regulatory proteins, themselves, are not conserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology
Pages55-64
Number of pages10
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameCold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology
Volume74
ISSN (Print)00917451

Fingerprint

Chromosomes
Cell Cycle
Cells
Eukaryotic Cells
Proteins
Caulobacter crescentus
Asymmetric Cell Division
cdc Genes
Genetic Structures
DNA-Binding Proteins
DNA Methylation
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Proteolysis
Cues
Phosphorylation
Drive
Networks (circuits)
Bacteria
DNA
Plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Goley, E. D., Toro, E., McAdams, H. H., & Shapiro, L. (2009). Dynamic chromosome organization and protein localization coordinate the regulatory circuitry that drives the bacterial cell cycle. In Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology (Vol. 74, pp. 55-64). (Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology; Vol. 74). https://doi.org/10.1101/sqb.2009.74.005

Dynamic chromosome organization and protein localization coordinate the regulatory circuitry that drives the bacterial cell cycle. / Goley, Erin D; Toro, E.; McAdams, H. H.; Shapiro, L.

Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. Vol. 74 2009. p. 55-64 (Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology; Vol. 74).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Goley, ED, Toro, E, McAdams, HH & Shapiro, L 2009, Dynamic chromosome organization and protein localization coordinate the regulatory circuitry that drives the bacterial cell cycle. in Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. vol. 74, Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology, vol. 74, pp. 55-64. https://doi.org/10.1101/sqb.2009.74.005
Goley ED, Toro E, McAdams HH, Shapiro L. Dynamic chromosome organization and protein localization coordinate the regulatory circuitry that drives the bacterial cell cycle. In Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. Vol. 74. 2009. p. 55-64. (Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology). https://doi.org/10.1101/sqb.2009.74.005
Goley, Erin D ; Toro, E. ; McAdams, H. H. ; Shapiro, L. / Dynamic chromosome organization and protein localization coordinate the regulatory circuitry that drives the bacterial cell cycle. Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. Vol. 74 2009. pp. 55-64 (Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology).
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