Dynacortin contributes to cortical viscoelasticity and helps define the shape changes of cytokinesis

Kristine D. Girard, Charles Chaney, Michael Delannoy, Scot C. Kuo, Douglas N. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During cytokinesis, global and equatorial pathways deform the cell cortex in a stereotypical manner, which leads to daughter cell separation. Equatorial forces are largely generated by myosin-II and the actin crosslinker, cortexillin-I. In contrast, global mechanics are determined by the cortical cytoskeleton, including the actin crosslinker, dynacortin. We used direct morphometric characterization and laser-tracking microrheology to quantify cortical mechanical properties of wild-type and cortexillin-I and dynacortin mutant Dictyostelium cells. Both cortexillin-I and dynacortin influence cytokinesis and interphase cortical viscoelasticity as predicted from genetics and biochemical data using purified dynacortin proteins. Our studies suggest that the regulation of cytokinesis ultimately requires modulation of proteins that control the cortical mechanical properties that establish the force-balance that specifies the shapes of cytokinesis. The combination of genetic, biochemical, and biophysical observations suggests that the cell's cortical mechanical properties control how the cortex is remodeled during cytokinesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1536-1546
Number of pages11
JournalEMBO Journal
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 7 2004

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Keywords

  • Cell morphology
  • Cortical mechanics
  • Cytokinesis Dictyostelium
  • Rheology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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