Duodenum electrical stimulation delays gastric emptying, reduces food intake and accelerates small bowel transit in pigs

Xiaohong Xu, Yong Lei, Jiande D.Z. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Duodenum electrical stimulation (DES) has been shown to delay gastric emptying and reduce food intake in dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DES on gastric emptying, small bowel transit and food intake in pigs, a large animal model of obesity. The study consisted of three experiments (gastric emptying, small bowel transit, and food intake) in pigs implanted with internal duodenal electrodes for DES and one or two duodenal cannulas for gastric emptying and small bowel transit. We found that (i) gastric emptying was dose-dependently delayed by DES of different stimulation parameters; (ii) small bowel transit was significantly accelerated with continuous DES in proximal intestine but not with intermittent DES; (iii) DES significantly reduced body weight gain with 100% duty cycle (DC), but not with DES with 40% DC. A marginal difference was noted in food intake among 100% DC session, 40% DC session, and control session. DES with long pulses energy-dependently inhibits gastric emptying in pigs. DES with appropriate parameters accelerates proximal small bowel transit in pigs. DES reduces body weight gain in obese pigs, and this therapeutic effect on obesity is mediated by inhibiting gastric emptying and food intake, and may also possibly by accelerating intestinal transit. DES may have a potential application to treat patients with obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-448
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Duodenum electrical stimulation delays gastric emptying, reduces food intake and accelerates small bowel transit in pigs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this