DSM-III major depressive disorder in the community. A latent class analysis of data from the NIMH Epidemiologic Catchment Area Programme

William W Eaton, A. Dryman, A. Sorenson, A. McCutcheon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The fit of the structure of DSM-III major depressive disorder to data from two large epidemiological surveys is assessed by latent class analysis. The surveys were conducted at the Baltimore and Raleigh-Durham sites of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program. Three classes are required to fit the data, and the third class bears a strong resemblance to major depressive disorder, although it requires slightly more symptoms to be present than DSM-III. The derived structure replicates successfully for Baltimore and Raleigh-Durham, with a prevalence of the major depression category of 0.9% for both sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-54
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume155
Issue numberJUL.
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.)
Baltimore
Major Depressive Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Depression
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

DSM-III major depressive disorder in the community. A latent class analysis of data from the NIMH Epidemiologic Catchment Area Programme. / Eaton, William W; Dryman, A.; Sorenson, A.; McCutcheon, A.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 155, No. JUL., 1989, p. 48-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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