Drug delivery systems' role in preventing central line-associated bacteraemia: An international perspective

Alan Lyles, John Fanikos, George Whitelaw, K. B. Bamford, E. Bouza, Victor D. Rosenthal, Wing Hong Seto, S. Shoham, C. Von Eiff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study objectives: An International Roundtable of infectious disease experts reviewed regional differences in approaches to healthcare-associated bacteraemia reduction, assessed the drug delivery system's role, and made best practice recommendations. Results: Bloodstream infection (BSI) surveillance and clinical management practices vary greatly within and between nations, particularly between economically developed and low income countries. The solution is not to impose a single standard since actions that reduce BSIs and their optimal sequence also differ by a region's economic development level. Conclusion: Education improves BSI rates most where rates are catastrophic; however, reducing already low rates requires more than education. Consequently, technology's greatest impact will be when drug delivery systems are already quite improved. The participants made seven recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalEJHP Practice
Volume15
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 27 2009

Keywords

  • Bacteraemia
  • Bloodstream infection
  • Central line
  • Drug delivery system
  • International surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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