Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria

Sibao Wang, André L.A. Dos-Santos, Wei Huang, Kun Connie Liu, Mohammad Ali Oshaghi, Ge Wei, Peter Agre, Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The huge burden of malaria in developing countries urgently demands the development of novel approaches to fight this deadly disease. Although engineered symbiotic bacteria have been shown to render mosquitoes resistant to the parasite, the challenge remains to effectively introduce such bacteria into mosquito populations. We describe a Serratia bacterium strain (AS1) isolated from Anopheles ovaries that stably colonizes the mosquito midgut, female ovaries, and male accessory glands and spreads rapidly throughout mosquito populations. Serratia AS1 was genetically engineered for secretion of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, and the recombinant strains inhibit development of Plasmodium falciparum in mosquitoes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1399-1402
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume357
Issue number6358
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 29 2017

Fingerprint

Plasmodium falciparum
Culicidae
Bacteria
Serratia
Ovary
Anopheles
Plasmodium
Recombinant Proteins
Population
Developing Countries
Malaria
Parasites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • General

Cite this

Wang, S., Dos-Santos, A. L. A., Huang, W., Liu, K. C., Oshaghi, M. A., Wei, G., ... Jacobs-Lorena, M. (2017). Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria. Science, 357(6358), 1399-1402. DOI: 10.1126/science.aan5478

Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria. / Wang, Sibao; Dos-Santos, André L.A.; Huang, Wei; Liu, Kun Connie; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Wei, Ge; Agre, Peter; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo.

In: Science, Vol. 357, No. 6358, 29.09.2017, p. 1399-1402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, S, Dos-Santos, ALA, Huang, W, Liu, KC, Oshaghi, MA, Wei, G, Agre, P & Jacobs-Lorena, M 2017, 'Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria' Science, vol. 357, no. 6358, pp. 1399-1402. DOI: 10.1126/science.aan5478
Wang S, Dos-Santos ALA, Huang W, Liu KC, Oshaghi MA, Wei G et al. Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria. Science. 2017 Sep 29;357(6358):1399-1402. Available from, DOI: 10.1126/science.aan5478
Wang, Sibao ; Dos-Santos, André L.A. ; Huang, Wei ; Liu, Kun Connie ; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali ; Wei, Ge ; Agre, Peter ; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo. / Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria. In: Science. 2017 ; Vol. 357, No. 6358. pp. 1399-1402
@article{4d5db7f7f1d744cda82e16dc486b0ae7,
title = "Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria",
abstract = "The huge burden of malaria in developing countries urgently demands the development of novel approaches to fight this deadly disease. Although engineered symbiotic bacteria have been shown to render mosquitoes resistant to the parasite, the challenge remains to effectively introduce such bacteria into mosquito populations. We describe a Serratia bacterium strain (AS1) isolated from Anopheles ovaries that stably colonizes the mosquito midgut, female ovaries, and male accessory glands and spreads rapidly throughout mosquito populations. Serratia AS1 was genetically engineered for secretion of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, and the recombinant strains inhibit development of Plasmodium falciparum in mosquitoes.",
author = "Sibao Wang and Dos-Santos, {Andr{\'e} L.A.} and Wei Huang and Liu, {Kun Connie} and Oshaghi, {Mohammad Ali} and Ge Wei and Peter Agre and Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1126/science.aan5478",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "357",
pages = "1399--1402",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "6358",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria

AU - Wang,Sibao

AU - Dos-Santos,André L.A.

AU - Huang,Wei

AU - Liu,Kun Connie

AU - Oshaghi,Mohammad Ali

AU - Wei,Ge

AU - Agre,Peter

AU - Jacobs-Lorena,Marcelo

PY - 2017/9/29

Y1 - 2017/9/29

N2 - The huge burden of malaria in developing countries urgently demands the development of novel approaches to fight this deadly disease. Although engineered symbiotic bacteria have been shown to render mosquitoes resistant to the parasite, the challenge remains to effectively introduce such bacteria into mosquito populations. We describe a Serratia bacterium strain (AS1) isolated from Anopheles ovaries that stably colonizes the mosquito midgut, female ovaries, and male accessory glands and spreads rapidly throughout mosquito populations. Serratia AS1 was genetically engineered for secretion of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, and the recombinant strains inhibit development of Plasmodium falciparum in mosquitoes.

AB - The huge burden of malaria in developing countries urgently demands the development of novel approaches to fight this deadly disease. Although engineered symbiotic bacteria have been shown to render mosquitoes resistant to the parasite, the challenge remains to effectively introduce such bacteria into mosquito populations. We describe a Serratia bacterium strain (AS1) isolated from Anopheles ovaries that stably colonizes the mosquito midgut, female ovaries, and male accessory glands and spreads rapidly throughout mosquito populations. Serratia AS1 was genetically engineered for secretion of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, and the recombinant strains inhibit development of Plasmodium falciparum in mosquitoes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030125023&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030125023&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.aan5478

DO - 10.1126/science.aan5478

M3 - Article

VL - 357

SP - 1399

EP - 1402

JO - Science

T2 - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 6358

ER -