Driver distance from the steering wheel: Perception and objective measurement

Maria Segui-Gomez, Jonathan Levy, Henry Roman, Kimberly M. Thompson, Kathleen McCabe, John D. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. This study assessed the accuracy of driver perceptions of the distance between the driver's nose and the steering wheel of the vehicle as a factor in considering driver disconnection of an airbag contained in the steering wheel for preventing injury to the driver in an accident. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 1000 drivers was done to obtain perceived and objective measurements of the distance between the driver's nose and the steering wheel of the vehicle. Results. Of 234 drivers who believed that they sat within 12 inches of the steering wheel, only 8 (3%) actually did so, whereas of 658 drivers who did not believe that they sat within 12 inches of the wheel, 14 (2%) did so. Shorter drivers were more likely than taller ones to both underestimate and overestimate their seating distance. Conclusions. Considerable mis-perception of drivers' distance from the wheel indicates that drivers should objectively measure this distance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1109-1111
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume89
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Driver distance from the steering wheel: Perception and objective measurement'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this