Traitement et contamination des systèmes d’eau potable dans le camp de réfugiés de Chatila à Beyrouth, au Liban

Translated title of the contribution: Drinking water system treatment and contamination in shatila refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon

S. Khoury, T. Graczyk, G. Burnham, M. Jurdi, L. R. Goldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Drinking water at Shatila Palestinian Refugee Camp in Beirut, Lebanon is of poor quality and unpredictably intermittent quantity. We aimed to characterize drinking water sources and contamination at Shatila and determine how drinking water can be managed to reduce community health burdens. We interviewed the Popular Committee, well owners, water vendors, water shopkeepers and preschool administrators about drinking water sources, treatment methods and the population served. Water samples from the sources and intermediaries were analysed for thermotolerant faecal coliforms (FCs), Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum and microsporidia, using immunofluorescent antibody detection for G. lamblia and C. parvum, and chromotrope-2 stain for microsporidia. All drinking water sources were contaminated with FCs and parasites. FC counts (cfu/mL) were as follows: wells (35-300), water vendors (2-178), shops (30-300) and preschools (230-300). Responsible factors identified included: unskilled operators; improper maintenance of wells and equipment; lack of proper water storage and handling; and misperception of water quality. These factors must be addressed to improve water quality at Shatila and other refugee camps.

Translated title of the contributionDrinking water system treatment and contamination in shatila refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)568-578
Number of pages11
JournalEastern Mediterranean Health Journal
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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