Downstream of the homeotic genes

Deborah J Andrew, M. P. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The homeotic genes of Drosophila melanogaster determine which structures form in each of the body segments. Disrupting the function of the homeotic genes causes body parts found in one domain of the animal to be replaced by body parts normally found elsewhere. Each of the homeotic genes encodes a protein, or a closely related family of proteins, which is capable of binding DNA and controlling the transcriptional activities of downstream genes. The homeotic genes are in the middle of a complex regulatory network, and many of the genes that control homeotic expression have been well characterized. However, very little is known about what comes after the homeotic genes, the downstream genes whose activities are regulated by the homeotic genes. Here, we review the known relationships between the homeotic proteins and the few identified target genes. The details of these interactions may be characteristic and may thus guide the search for additional targets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-15
Number of pages11
JournalNew Biologist
Volume4
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Homeobox Genes
Genes
Human Body
Homeodomain Proteins
Gene Regulatory Networks
Drosophila melanogaster
Proteins
DNA
Animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Andrew, D. J., & Scott, M. P. (1992). Downstream of the homeotic genes. New Biologist, 4(1), 5-15.

Downstream of the homeotic genes. / Andrew, Deborah J; Scott, M. P.

In: New Biologist, Vol. 4, No. 1, 1992, p. 5-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrew, DJ & Scott, MP 1992, 'Downstream of the homeotic genes', New Biologist, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 5-15.
Andrew, Deborah J ; Scott, M. P. / Downstream of the homeotic genes. In: New Biologist. 1992 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 5-15.
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