Does Training Background Influence Decision-Making in the Management of Zygomaticomaxillary Complex Fractures?

Srinivas M. Susarla, Gerhard S. Mundinger, Devin O'Brien-Coon, Thomas B. Dodson, Paul N. Manson, Zachary S. Peacock, Amir H. Dorafshar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose Management of zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) fractures should be based on injury patterns and not on training background. This study assessed management decisions for ZMC injuries among surgeons with different training backgrounds. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study of surgeons who evaluated 5 ZMC injury cases. The primary predictor variable was training background: plastic and reconstructive surgeons (PRSs), craniofacial PRSs (c-PRSs), and oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs). Other variables were years in practice, fellowship training, practice scope, and comfort with managing facial injuries. The primary outcome variable was management of the ZMC and orbital floor (operative vs nonoperative). Secondary outcome measurements were related to surgical approaches and fixation. Descriptive, bivariate, and regression statistics were computed. Results Twenty-one surgeons (7 PRSs, 7 c-PRSs, and 7 OMSs) with an average of 14.4 ± 12.6 years of experience provided a total of 105 treatment plans. There was significant agreement between c-PRSs and OMSs for management of ZMC and orbital floor injuries (rs = 0.70 and 0.76, respectively; P ≤.001). PRSs did not have substantial agreement with c-PRSs or OMSs with regard to ZMC fractures (rs = 0.39 and 0.49, respectively; P ≤.06), but significant agreement with regard to orbital floor injuries (rs = 0.70 and 0.76, respectively; P <.001). In a regression model, injury pattern was the only factor associated with operative management (P ≤.001). Conclusions There is substantial agreement between OMSs and c-PRSs regarding the management of ZMC fractures and associated orbital floor injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)995-1012
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume74
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does Training Background Influence Decision-Making in the Management of Zygomaticomaxillary Complex Fractures?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this