Does Tobacco Outlet Inequality Extend to High-White Mid-Atlantic Jurisdictions? A Study of Socioeconomic Status and Density

David O. Fakunle, Roland J Thorpe, C. Debra M. Furr-Holden, Frank C Curriero, Philip Leaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tobacco outlet density research has evolved to require a more refined examination of socioeconomic status’ influence beyond median household income. This study investigates the effects of SES on census-tract-level tobacco outlet density in five predominantly White Maryland jurisdictions. Tobacco license addresses and demographic data were analyzed via t tests and spatial lag modeling. Results showed that higher SES jurisdictions had lower tobacco outlet density than lower SES jurisdictions despite similar White populations and that median household income had consistent associations with tobacco outlet density. This study corroborates findings that differences in SES correlate with differences in tobacco outlet density between racially similar areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of racial and ethnic health disparities
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Social Class
nicotine
Tobacco
jurisdiction
social status
household income
Censuses
Licensure
license
census
Demography
examination
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Census tracts
  • Education
  • Income
  • Race
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Tobacco outlets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Tobacco outlet density research has evolved to require a more refined examination of socioeconomic status’ influence beyond median household income. This study investigates the effects of SES on census-tract-level tobacco outlet density in five predominantly White Maryland jurisdictions. Tobacco license addresses and demographic data were analyzed via t tests and spatial lag modeling. Results showed that higher SES jurisdictions had lower tobacco outlet density than lower SES jurisdictions despite similar White populations and that median household income had consistent associations with tobacco outlet density. This study corroborates findings that differences in SES correlate with differences in tobacco outlet density between racially similar areas.",
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AB - Tobacco outlet density research has evolved to require a more refined examination of socioeconomic status’ influence beyond median household income. This study investigates the effects of SES on census-tract-level tobacco outlet density in five predominantly White Maryland jurisdictions. Tobacco license addresses and demographic data were analyzed via t tests and spatial lag modeling. Results showed that higher SES jurisdictions had lower tobacco outlet density than lower SES jurisdictions despite similar White populations and that median household income had consistent associations with tobacco outlet density. This study corroborates findings that differences in SES correlate with differences in tobacco outlet density between racially similar areas.

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