Does this patient really want treatment? Factors associated with baseline and evolving readiness for change among hospitalized substance using adults interested in treatment

Robin A. Pollini, Thomas P. O'Toole, Daniel E Ford, George Bigelow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Little is known about motivation for treatment and readiness for change during an acute medical event. We present data from a cohort of 353 actively substance abusing adults assessed at baseline and every three days during their hospital admission for readiness to change substance use behaviors (URICA), self-reported motivations for substance abuse treatment, and pain and withdrawal symptoms. Factors independently associated with being in a higher (i.e., contemplation or action) stage of change included female sex (AOR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.42, 3.81), being on probation or parole (AOR = 2.55; 95% CI: 1.32, 4.93), bipolar disorder (AOR 2.60; 95% CI: 1.20, 5.63), believing they would get sick again if drug use continued (AOR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.70), being "tired of using" (AOR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.21, 6.96) and family concerns (AOR = 1.78; 95% CI: 1.08, 2.96). During their hospitalization 43.6% increased from precontemplation or contemplation to a higher stage or remained in the action stage. Believing one would get sick again if substance use continued (AOR = 2.42; 95% CI: 1.07, 5.48), physical health concerns (AOR = 5.28; 95% CI: 1.36, 20.44) and citing "tired of using" as a primary motivator (AOR = 2.88; 95% CI: 1.10, 7.54) were independently associated with increased stage of change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1904-1918
Number of pages15
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

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Motivation
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Bipolar Disorder
Substance-Related Disorders
Hospitalization
Health
Pain
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Hospitalization
  • Medical co-morbidities
  • Motivation
  • Readiness for change
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Does this patient really want treatment? Factors associated with baseline and evolving readiness for change among hospitalized substance using adults interested in treatment",
abstract = "Little is known about motivation for treatment and readiness for change during an acute medical event. We present data from a cohort of 353 actively substance abusing adults assessed at baseline and every three days during their hospital admission for readiness to change substance use behaviors (URICA), self-reported motivations for substance abuse treatment, and pain and withdrawal symptoms. Factors independently associated with being in a higher (i.e., contemplation or action) stage of change included female sex (AOR = 2.33; 95{\%} CI: 1.42, 3.81), being on probation or parole (AOR = 2.55; 95{\%} CI: 1.32, 4.93), bipolar disorder (AOR 2.60; 95{\%} CI: 1.20, 5.63), believing they would get sick again if drug use continued (AOR = 2.24; 95{\%} CI: 1.36, 3.70), being {"}tired of using{"} (AOR = 2.91; 95{\%} CI: 1.21, 6.96) and family concerns (AOR = 1.78; 95{\%} CI: 1.08, 2.96). During their hospitalization 43.6{\%} increased from precontemplation or contemplation to a higher stage or remained in the action stage. Believing one would get sick again if substance use continued (AOR = 2.42; 95{\%} CI: 1.07, 5.48), physical health concerns (AOR = 5.28; 95{\%} CI: 1.36, 20.44) and citing {"}tired of using{"} as a primary motivator (AOR = 2.88; 95{\%} CI: 1.10, 7.54) were independently associated with increased stage of change.",
keywords = "Hospitalization, Medical co-morbidities, Motivation, Readiness for change, Substance abuse",
author = "Pollini, {Robin A.} and O'Toole, {Thomas P.} and Ford, {Daniel E} and George Bigelow",
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T1 - Does this patient really want treatment? Factors associated with baseline and evolving readiness for change among hospitalized substance using adults interested in treatment

AU - Pollini, Robin A.

AU - O'Toole, Thomas P.

AU - Ford, Daniel E

AU - Bigelow, George

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N2 - Little is known about motivation for treatment and readiness for change during an acute medical event. We present data from a cohort of 353 actively substance abusing adults assessed at baseline and every three days during their hospital admission for readiness to change substance use behaviors (URICA), self-reported motivations for substance abuse treatment, and pain and withdrawal symptoms. Factors independently associated with being in a higher (i.e., contemplation or action) stage of change included female sex (AOR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.42, 3.81), being on probation or parole (AOR = 2.55; 95% CI: 1.32, 4.93), bipolar disorder (AOR 2.60; 95% CI: 1.20, 5.63), believing they would get sick again if drug use continued (AOR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.70), being "tired of using" (AOR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.21, 6.96) and family concerns (AOR = 1.78; 95% CI: 1.08, 2.96). During their hospitalization 43.6% increased from precontemplation or contemplation to a higher stage or remained in the action stage. Believing one would get sick again if substance use continued (AOR = 2.42; 95% CI: 1.07, 5.48), physical health concerns (AOR = 5.28; 95% CI: 1.36, 20.44) and citing "tired of using" as a primary motivator (AOR = 2.88; 95% CI: 1.10, 7.54) were independently associated with increased stage of change.

AB - Little is known about motivation for treatment and readiness for change during an acute medical event. We present data from a cohort of 353 actively substance abusing adults assessed at baseline and every three days during their hospital admission for readiness to change substance use behaviors (URICA), self-reported motivations for substance abuse treatment, and pain and withdrawal symptoms. Factors independently associated with being in a higher (i.e., contemplation or action) stage of change included female sex (AOR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.42, 3.81), being on probation or parole (AOR = 2.55; 95% CI: 1.32, 4.93), bipolar disorder (AOR 2.60; 95% CI: 1.20, 5.63), believing they would get sick again if drug use continued (AOR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.70), being "tired of using" (AOR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.21, 6.96) and family concerns (AOR = 1.78; 95% CI: 1.08, 2.96). During their hospitalization 43.6% increased from precontemplation or contemplation to a higher stage or remained in the action stage. Believing one would get sick again if substance use continued (AOR = 2.42; 95% CI: 1.07, 5.48), physical health concerns (AOR = 5.28; 95% CI: 1.36, 20.44) and citing "tired of using" as a primary motivator (AOR = 2.88; 95% CI: 1.10, 7.54) were independently associated with increased stage of change.

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