Does the presence of psychosocial yellow flags alter patient-provider communication for work-related, acute low back pain?

William S. Shaw, Glenn Pransky, Thomas Winters, Torill H. Tveito, Susan M Larson, Debra Roter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: To determine whether patterns of patient-provider communication might vary depending on psychosocial risk factors for back disability. METHODS:: Working adults (N = 97; 64% men; median age = 38 years) with work-related low back pain completed a risk factor questionnaire and then agreed to have provider visits audiotaped. Verbal exchanges were divided into utterances and coded for content, then compared among low-, medium-, and high-risk patients. RESULTS:: Among high-risk patients only, providers asked more biomedical questions, patients provided more biomedical information, and providers used more language to engage patients and facilitate communication. There were no group differences in psychosocial exchanges. CONCLUSIONS:: Clinicians may recognize the need for more detailed assessment of patients with multiple psychosocial factors, but increases in communication are focused on medical explanations and therapeutic regimen, not on lifestyle and psychosocial factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1032-1040
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume51
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

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Low Back Pain
Communication
Psychology
Life Style
Language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Does the presence of psychosocial yellow flags alter patient-provider communication for work-related, acute low back pain? / Shaw, William S.; Pransky, Glenn; Winters, Thomas; Tveito, Torill H.; Larson, Susan M; Roter, Debra.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 51, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 1032-1040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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