Does the piperacillin minimum inhibitory concentration for pseudomonas aeruginosa influence clinical outcomes of children with pseudomonal bacteremia?

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Abstract

Background. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recently elected to adjust the previous piperacillin susceptibility breakpoint of ≤64 g/mL against Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ≤16 g/mL, based largely on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling studies. Data on whether PK-PD modeling correlates with clinical outcomes in children are needed before resorting to broader classes of antibiotics to treat P. aeruginosa.Methods.We performed a retrospective cohort study of children with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between 2001 and 2010 who were prescribed piperacillin. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes of children with piperacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤16 g/mL and of 32-64 g/mL were compared. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality.Results.There were 170 children with P. aeruginosa bacteremia receiving piperacillin therapy who met inclusion criteria. One hundred twenty-four (72) children had piperacillin MICs of ≤16 g/mL and 46 (28) children had piperacillin MICs of 32-64 g/mL. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between the 2 groups. Thirty-day mortality was 9 and 24 in children with a piperacillin MIC of ≤16 g/mL and of 32-64 g/mL, respectively. Using multivariable logistic regression, children with elevated MICs had increased odds of mortality compared with children with lower MICs (odds ratio, 3.21; 95 confidence interval, 1.26-8.16).Conclusions.Our finding that elevated piperacillin MICs are associated with higher mortality in children supports the recent CLSI recommendation to lower the breakpoint of piperacillin against P. aeruginosa to ≤16 g/mL. Alternate therapeutic choices should be considered when piperacillin MICs against P. aeruginosa are ≥32 g/mL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)799-806
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Piperacillin
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Bacteremia
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Mortality
Pharmacokinetics
Child Mortality
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Anti-Bacterial Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{bbf7db9844ac4c2e93772ca223239d67,
title = "Does the piperacillin minimum inhibitory concentration for pseudomonas aeruginosa influence clinical outcomes of children with pseudomonal bacteremia?",
abstract = "Background. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recently elected to adjust the previous piperacillin susceptibility breakpoint of ≤64 g/mL against Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ≤16 g/mL, based largely on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling studies. Data on whether PK-PD modeling correlates with clinical outcomes in children are needed before resorting to broader classes of antibiotics to treat P. aeruginosa.Methods.We performed a retrospective cohort study of children with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between 2001 and 2010 who were prescribed piperacillin. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes of children with piperacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤16 g/mL and of 32-64 g/mL were compared. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality.Results.There were 170 children with P. aeruginosa bacteremia receiving piperacillin therapy who met inclusion criteria. One hundred twenty-four (72) children had piperacillin MICs of ≤16 g/mL and 46 (28) children had piperacillin MICs of 32-64 g/mL. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between the 2 groups. Thirty-day mortality was 9 and 24 in children with a piperacillin MIC of ≤16 g/mL and of 32-64 g/mL, respectively. Using multivariable logistic regression, children with elevated MICs had increased odds of mortality compared with children with lower MICs (odds ratio, 3.21; 95 confidence interval, 1.26-8.16).Conclusions.Our finding that elevated piperacillin MICs are associated with higher mortality in children supports the recent CLSI recommendation to lower the breakpoint of piperacillin against P. aeruginosa to ≤16 g/mL. Alternate therapeutic choices should be considered when piperacillin MICs against P. aeruginosa are ≥32 g/mL.",
author = "Pranita Tamma and Alison Turnbull and Aaron Milstone and Hsu, {Alice J.} and Carroll, {Karen C} and Sara Cosgrove",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1093/cid/cis545",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "799--806",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "6",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Does the piperacillin minimum inhibitory concentration for pseudomonas aeruginosa influence clinical outcomes of children with pseudomonal bacteremia?

AU - Tamma, Pranita

AU - Turnbull, Alison

AU - Milstone, Aaron

AU - Hsu, Alice J.

AU - Carroll, Karen C

AU - Cosgrove, Sara

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - Background. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recently elected to adjust the previous piperacillin susceptibility breakpoint of ≤64 g/mL against Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ≤16 g/mL, based largely on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling studies. Data on whether PK-PD modeling correlates with clinical outcomes in children are needed before resorting to broader classes of antibiotics to treat P. aeruginosa.Methods.We performed a retrospective cohort study of children with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between 2001 and 2010 who were prescribed piperacillin. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes of children with piperacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤16 g/mL and of 32-64 g/mL were compared. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality.Results.There were 170 children with P. aeruginosa bacteremia receiving piperacillin therapy who met inclusion criteria. One hundred twenty-four (72) children had piperacillin MICs of ≤16 g/mL and 46 (28) children had piperacillin MICs of 32-64 g/mL. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between the 2 groups. Thirty-day mortality was 9 and 24 in children with a piperacillin MIC of ≤16 g/mL and of 32-64 g/mL, respectively. Using multivariable logistic regression, children with elevated MICs had increased odds of mortality compared with children with lower MICs (odds ratio, 3.21; 95 confidence interval, 1.26-8.16).Conclusions.Our finding that elevated piperacillin MICs are associated with higher mortality in children supports the recent CLSI recommendation to lower the breakpoint of piperacillin against P. aeruginosa to ≤16 g/mL. Alternate therapeutic choices should be considered when piperacillin MICs against P. aeruginosa are ≥32 g/mL.

AB - Background. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recently elected to adjust the previous piperacillin susceptibility breakpoint of ≤64 g/mL against Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ≤16 g/mL, based largely on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling studies. Data on whether PK-PD modeling correlates with clinical outcomes in children are needed before resorting to broader classes of antibiotics to treat P. aeruginosa.Methods.We performed a retrospective cohort study of children with P. aeruginosa bacteremia between 2001 and 2010 who were prescribed piperacillin. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes of children with piperacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤16 g/mL and of 32-64 g/mL were compared. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality.Results.There were 170 children with P. aeruginosa bacteremia receiving piperacillin therapy who met inclusion criteria. One hundred twenty-four (72) children had piperacillin MICs of ≤16 g/mL and 46 (28) children had piperacillin MICs of 32-64 g/mL. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between the 2 groups. Thirty-day mortality was 9 and 24 in children with a piperacillin MIC of ≤16 g/mL and of 32-64 g/mL, respectively. Using multivariable logistic regression, children with elevated MICs had increased odds of mortality compared with children with lower MICs (odds ratio, 3.21; 95 confidence interval, 1.26-8.16).Conclusions.Our finding that elevated piperacillin MICs are associated with higher mortality in children supports the recent CLSI recommendation to lower the breakpoint of piperacillin against P. aeruginosa to ≤16 g/mL. Alternate therapeutic choices should be considered when piperacillin MICs against P. aeruginosa are ≥32 g/mL.

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U2 - 10.1093/cid/cis545

DO - 10.1093/cid/cis545

M3 - Article

C2 - 22696019

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VL - 55

SP - 799

EP - 806

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

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