Does the location of bruch’s membrane opening change over time? Longitudinal analysis using San Diego automated layer segmentation algorithm (SALSA)

Akram Belghith, Christopher Bowd, Felipe A. Medeiros, Naama Hammel, Zhiyong Yang, Robert N. Weinreb, Linda M. Zangwill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE. We determined if the Bruch’s membrane opening (BMO) location changes over time in healthy eyes and eyes with progressing glaucoma, and validated an automated segmentation algorithm for identifying the BMO in Cirrus high-definition coherence tomography (HD-OCT) images. METHODS. We followed 95 eyes (35 progressing glaucoma and 60 healthy) for an average of 3.7 ± 1.1 years. A stable group of 50 eyes had repeated tests over a short period. In each B-scan of the stable group, the BMO points were delineated manually and automatically to assess the reproducibility of both segmentation methods. Moreover, the BMO location variation over time was assessed longitudinally on the aligned images in 3D space point by point in x, y, and z directions. RESULTS. Mean visual field mean deviation at baseline of the progressing glaucoma group was -7.7 dB. Mixed-effects models revealed small nonsignificant changes in BMO location over time for all directions in healthy eyes (the smallest P value was 0.39) and in the progressing glaucoma eyes (the smallest P value was 0.30). In the stable group, the overall intervisit–intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) were 98.4% and 2.1%, respectively, for the manual segmentation and 98.1% and 1.9%, respectively, for the automated algorithm CONCLUSIONS. Bruch’s membrane opening location was stable in normal and progressing glaucoma eyes with follow-up between 3 and 4 years indicating that it can be used as reference point in monitoring glaucoma progression. The BMO location estimation with Cirrus HD-OCT using manual and automated segmentation showed excellent reproducibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-682
Number of pages8
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Bruch Membrane
Glaucoma
Tomography
Visual Fields

Keywords

  • Automated segmentation
  • BMO location variation
  • Glaucoma
  • Reference plane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Does the location of bruch’s membrane opening change over time? Longitudinal analysis using San Diego automated layer segmentation algorithm (SALSA). / Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Hammel, Naama; Yang, Zhiyong; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 57, No. 2, 01.01.2016, p. 675-682.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Belghith, Akram ; Bowd, Christopher ; Medeiros, Felipe A. ; Hammel, Naama ; Yang, Zhiyong ; Weinreb, Robert N. ; Zangwill, Linda M. / Does the location of bruch’s membrane opening change over time? Longitudinal analysis using San Diego automated layer segmentation algorithm (SALSA). In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2016 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 675-682.
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AU - Bowd, Christopher

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AU - Hammel, Naama

AU - Yang, Zhiyong

AU - Weinreb, Robert N.

AU - Zangwill, Linda M.

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N2 - PURPOSE. We determined if the Bruch’s membrane opening (BMO) location changes over time in healthy eyes and eyes with progressing glaucoma, and validated an automated segmentation algorithm for identifying the BMO in Cirrus high-definition coherence tomography (HD-OCT) images. METHODS. We followed 95 eyes (35 progressing glaucoma and 60 healthy) for an average of 3.7 ± 1.1 years. A stable group of 50 eyes had repeated tests over a short period. In each B-scan of the stable group, the BMO points were delineated manually and automatically to assess the reproducibility of both segmentation methods. Moreover, the BMO location variation over time was assessed longitudinally on the aligned images in 3D space point by point in x, y, and z directions. RESULTS. Mean visual field mean deviation at baseline of the progressing glaucoma group was -7.7 dB. Mixed-effects models revealed small nonsignificant changes in BMO location over time for all directions in healthy eyes (the smallest P value was 0.39) and in the progressing glaucoma eyes (the smallest P value was 0.30). In the stable group, the overall intervisit–intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) were 98.4% and 2.1%, respectively, for the manual segmentation and 98.1% and 1.9%, respectively, for the automated algorithm CONCLUSIONS. Bruch’s membrane opening location was stable in normal and progressing glaucoma eyes with follow-up between 3 and 4 years indicating that it can be used as reference point in monitoring glaucoma progression. The BMO location estimation with Cirrus HD-OCT using manual and automated segmentation showed excellent reproducibility.

AB - PURPOSE. We determined if the Bruch’s membrane opening (BMO) location changes over time in healthy eyes and eyes with progressing glaucoma, and validated an automated segmentation algorithm for identifying the BMO in Cirrus high-definition coherence tomography (HD-OCT) images. METHODS. We followed 95 eyes (35 progressing glaucoma and 60 healthy) for an average of 3.7 ± 1.1 years. A stable group of 50 eyes had repeated tests over a short period. In each B-scan of the stable group, the BMO points were delineated manually and automatically to assess the reproducibility of both segmentation methods. Moreover, the BMO location variation over time was assessed longitudinally on the aligned images in 3D space point by point in x, y, and z directions. RESULTS. Mean visual field mean deviation at baseline of the progressing glaucoma group was -7.7 dB. Mixed-effects models revealed small nonsignificant changes in BMO location over time for all directions in healthy eyes (the smallest P value was 0.39) and in the progressing glaucoma eyes (the smallest P value was 0.30). In the stable group, the overall intervisit–intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) were 98.4% and 2.1%, respectively, for the manual segmentation and 98.1% and 1.9%, respectively, for the automated algorithm CONCLUSIONS. Bruch’s membrane opening location was stable in normal and progressing glaucoma eyes with follow-up between 3 and 4 years indicating that it can be used as reference point in monitoring glaucoma progression. The BMO location estimation with Cirrus HD-OCT using manual and automated segmentation showed excellent reproducibility.

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KW - BMO location variation

KW - Glaucoma

KW - Reference plane

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