Does the experience of interpersonal predictors of suicidal desire predict positive attitudes toward Physician Assisted Suicide?

Raymond P. Tucker, Carmen A. Buchanan, Victoria M. O'Keefe, La Ricka R. Wingate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current study examined the relationship between Physician Assisted Suicide (PAS) attitudes and interpersonal risk factors of suicidal desire as outlined by the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior (Joiner, 2005). It was hypothesized that both thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness would be positively related to PAS acceptance. Results indicated that thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness predicted significance of favorable attitudes toward PAS in a college sample. Results suggest that attitudes toward PAS may be influenced by the experience of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness and provide a clear rationale for the study of these variables in populations more apt to consider hastened death. Future work regarding the application of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior in hastened death research is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-149
Number of pages13
JournalOmega (United States)
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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