Does the brain rest? An independent component analysis of temporally coherent brain networks at rest and during a cognitive task

Vince D. Calhoun

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Brain regions which exhibit temporally coherent fluctuations, have been increasingly studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Such networks are often identified in the context of an fMRI scan collected during rest (and thus are called "resting state networks"), however they are also present during (and modulated by) the performance of a cognitive task. In this paper we will refer to such networks as temporally coherent networks (TCNs). Independent component analysis (ICA) is one method being used to identify TCNs. ICA is a data driven approach which which is especially useful for decomposing activation during complex cognitive tasks where multiple operations occur simultaneously. In this paper we present results showing that TCNs are robust, and can be consistently identified at rest and during performance of a cognitive task in healthy individuals and in patients with schizophrenia. In summary, multiple TCNs are present at rest and during a cognitive task, but are modulated in complex ways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2008 IEEE Southwest Symposium on Image Analysis and Interpretation, SSIAI 2008 - Proceedings
Pages201-204
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event2008 IEEE Southwest Symposium on Image Analysis and Interpretation, SSIAI 2008 - Santa Fe, NM, United States
Duration: Mar 24 2008Mar 26 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE Southwest Symposium on Image Analysis and Interpretation

Other

Other2008 IEEE Southwest Symposium on Image Analysis and Interpretation, SSIAI 2008
CountryUnited States
CitySanta Fe, NM
Period3/24/083/26/08

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Science Applications

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