Does restoration of antegrade flow in the infarct-related coronary artery days to weeks after myocardial infarction improve long-term survival?

D. J. Moliterno, R. A. Lange, J. E. Willard, J. D. Boehrer, L. D. Hillis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have shown that survival after myocardial infarction is influenced by the presence or absence of antegrade flow in the infarct-related artery: patients with antegrade flow have a good prognosis, whereas those whose infarct-related artery is occluded are less likely to survive. Because revascularization-via bypass grafting or angioplasty-is an effective means of reestablishing flow in the infarct-related artery, this study was done to assess the influence of revascularization in the days to weeks after infarction on long-term mortality in survivors of infarction who have an occluded infarct-related artery. Methods: Over a 13-year period, 200 subjects (137 men, 63 women, aged 25 to 76 years) with their first infarction, no or minimal antegrade perfusion of the infarct-related coronary artery, and no disease of other arteries were followed for 42±30 months. Of these, 148 (group I) were treated medically, whereas 52 (group II) had bypass grafting (n = 20) or angioplasty (n = 32) of the infarct-related artery. Results: The groups were similar in age, sex, infarct-related artery, and left ventricular ejection fraction. Of the 148 group I subjects, 24 (16%) had cardiac-related mortality. In contrast, only one (2%) of the 52 group II subjects died of cardiac causes (P=0.008). This difference was especially marked in patients with disease of the left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary arteries. Conclusions: Thus, in survivors of myocardial infarction with limited or no antegrade flow in the infarct-related artery, mechanical restoration of antegrade perfusion may improve survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalCoronary Artery Disease
Volume3
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Coronary Vessels
Arteries
Myocardial Infarction
Survival
Infarction
Angioplasty
Survivors
Perfusion
Mortality
Stroke Volume
Coronary Artery Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Does restoration of antegrade flow in the infarct-related coronary artery days to weeks after myocardial infarction improve long-term survival? / Moliterno, D. J.; Lange, R. A.; Willard, J. E.; Boehrer, J. D.; Hillis, L. D.

In: Coronary Artery Disease, Vol. 3, No. 4, 1992, p. 299-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moliterno, D. J. ; Lange, R. A. ; Willard, J. E. ; Boehrer, J. D. ; Hillis, L. D. / Does restoration of antegrade flow in the infarct-related coronary artery days to weeks after myocardial infarction improve long-term survival?. In: Coronary Artery Disease. 1992 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 299-304.
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abstract = "Background: Previous studies have shown that survival after myocardial infarction is influenced by the presence or absence of antegrade flow in the infarct-related artery: patients with antegrade flow have a good prognosis, whereas those whose infarct-related artery is occluded are less likely to survive. Because revascularization-via bypass grafting or angioplasty-is an effective means of reestablishing flow in the infarct-related artery, this study was done to assess the influence of revascularization in the days to weeks after infarction on long-term mortality in survivors of infarction who have an occluded infarct-related artery. Methods: Over a 13-year period, 200 subjects (137 men, 63 women, aged 25 to 76 years) with their first infarction, no or minimal antegrade perfusion of the infarct-related coronary artery, and no disease of other arteries were followed for 42±30 months. Of these, 148 (group I) were treated medically, whereas 52 (group II) had bypass grafting (n = 20) or angioplasty (n = 32) of the infarct-related artery. Results: The groups were similar in age, sex, infarct-related artery, and left ventricular ejection fraction. Of the 148 group I subjects, 24 (16{\%}) had cardiac-related mortality. In contrast, only one (2{\%}) of the 52 group II subjects died of cardiac causes (P=0.008). This difference was especially marked in patients with disease of the left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary arteries. Conclusions: Thus, in survivors of myocardial infarction with limited or no antegrade flow in the infarct-related artery, mechanical restoration of antegrade perfusion may improve survival.",
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AU - Boehrer, J. D.

AU - Hillis, L. D.

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N2 - Background: Previous studies have shown that survival after myocardial infarction is influenced by the presence or absence of antegrade flow in the infarct-related artery: patients with antegrade flow have a good prognosis, whereas those whose infarct-related artery is occluded are less likely to survive. Because revascularization-via bypass grafting or angioplasty-is an effective means of reestablishing flow in the infarct-related artery, this study was done to assess the influence of revascularization in the days to weeks after infarction on long-term mortality in survivors of infarction who have an occluded infarct-related artery. Methods: Over a 13-year period, 200 subjects (137 men, 63 women, aged 25 to 76 years) with their first infarction, no or minimal antegrade perfusion of the infarct-related coronary artery, and no disease of other arteries were followed for 42±30 months. Of these, 148 (group I) were treated medically, whereas 52 (group II) had bypass grafting (n = 20) or angioplasty (n = 32) of the infarct-related artery. Results: The groups were similar in age, sex, infarct-related artery, and left ventricular ejection fraction. Of the 148 group I subjects, 24 (16%) had cardiac-related mortality. In contrast, only one (2%) of the 52 group II subjects died of cardiac causes (P=0.008). This difference was especially marked in patients with disease of the left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary arteries. Conclusions: Thus, in survivors of myocardial infarction with limited or no antegrade flow in the infarct-related artery, mechanical restoration of antegrade perfusion may improve survival.

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