Does nurse counseling or offer of nicotine gum improve the effectiveness of physician smoking-cessation advice?

M. Nebot, C. Cabezas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Medical advice and use of nicotine gum have recently received increased attention as effective tools to encourage smokers to quit, yet the relative value of nurse vs physician counseling has not been explored in depth. In this study, 425 smokers attending three urban primary care centers in Barcelona were systematically allocated to one of three groups: group A patients received a brief counseling session to quit from their family physician; group B patients were given the same brief counseling along with a free supply of nicotine gum; group C received a brief health-education session from the primary care nurse. Three hundred forty-nine patients (82%) could be reached by telephone at the two-month follow up. By that time, after correcting for the estimated validity of the phone report of smoking status, the proportion declaring themselves to be nonsmokers was 10.9%, 11.1%, and 10.8%, respectively, without significant differences between them. At one-year follow up the proportions were 4.4%, 5.3%, and 6.0%. In the logistic regression analysis, only the expected difficulty of quitting was predictive of one-year abstention, OR = 3.1 (95% CI: 1.3-7.3). The present study shows no difference between physician versus nurse counseling and no improvement in the proportion of quitters with the addition of nicotine gum in the physician-counseled group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-270
Number of pages8
JournalThe Family practice research journal
Volume12
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Smoking Cessation
Nicotine
Counseling
Nurses
Physicians
Primary Health Care
Family Physicians
Health Education
Telephone
Logistic Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Does nurse counseling or offer of nicotine gum improve the effectiveness of physician smoking-cessation advice? / Nebot, M.; Cabezas, C.

In: The Family practice research journal, Vol. 12, No. 3, 09.1992, p. 263-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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