Does Myelopathy Increase the Morbidity and Mortality of Elective Single-Level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion? An Updated Propensity-Matched Analysis of 3938 Patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database

Safwan Alomari, Daniel Lubelski, Amanda N. Sacino, Daniel M. Sciubba, Ali Bydon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Myelopathy is thought to be associated with higher morbidity and mortality after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF); however, the literature investigating this association has limitations. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of myelopathy on early perioperative complications of elective single-level ACDF. METHODS: Patients who underwent ACDF between 2016 and 2018 were reviewed from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. Propensity score matching analysis was used. RESULTS: Twenty percent of the cohort was myelopathic. These patients were significantly older, had more comorbidities, more likely to be functionally dependent, and to undergo emergency surgery when compared to the nonmyelopathic cohort. When 1969 myelopathic patients were 1:1 propensity matched with nonmyelopathic patients, there was no difference between the myelopathic and nonmyelopathic patients in incidence of postoperative intensive care unit admission or death. Patients in the myelopathic group were significantly more likely to have a nonhome discharge and less likely to be discharged on the first postoperative day. Myelopathic patients had a higher rate of return to operating room within the same admission (2.2%) as well as a higher unplanned readmission rate (4.2%). The total operation time (143 min) and average length of hospital stay (52 h) were significantly higher in the myelopathic group when compared to the nonmyelopathic group (117 min) and (33 h), respectively. CONCLUSION: Patients with myelopathy who undergo elective single-level ACDF have higher risks of several perioperative events including longer operative time, longer hospital stay, higher return to operating room, and unplanned readmission rates, when compared to nonmyelopathic patients. On the other hand, myelopathic patients did not exhibit higher mortality rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-115
Number of pages7
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume89
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2021

Keywords

  • Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF)
  • Myelopathy
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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